Rethinking human rights and criminal law on sexuality, gender & reproduction

Congratulations to the editors and authors of this new book, which examines the ways in which recourse to the criminal law is featured in work by human rights advocates regarding sexuality, gender, and reproduction. It also presents a framework for considering if, when, and under what conditions, recourse to criminal law is compatible with human rights. We are pleased to circulate links and the full Table of Contents:

Beyond Virtue and Vice:  Rethinking Human Rights and Criminal Law
ed.  Alice M. Miller and Mindy Jane Roseman,  Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019)  360 pages.
Book abstract and information.    Intro and excerpts from pp. 3-55 online.

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Introduction, by Alice M. Miller and Mindy Jane Roseman with Zain Rizvi, pp. 1-16. mostly online.

PART I: TRANSNATIONAL THEORY AND PRACTICE
1.  Janet Halley in conversation with Aziza Ahmed: Interview,. 17-38.  mostly online.
2.  Seismic Shifts: How prosecution became the go-to tool to vindicate rights, by Alice M. Miller with Tara Zivkovic, 39-53. 2 random pages online.
3.  The Harm principle meets morality offences: Human rights, Criminal Law, and the regulation of sex and gender, by Alli Jernow, 54-74  2 initial pages online.
4.  Reflections of a human rights activist, by Widney Brown,  75-90

PART II. NATIONAL HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES

5.   Virtuous Rights: On prostitution exceptionalism in South Korea, by Sealing Chen, and Ae-Ryung Kim, 93-113
6.   Brazilian Sex Laws: Continuities, ruptures and paradoxes, by Sonia Correa and Maria Lucia Karam, 114-133
7.   The Reach of a skirt in Southern Africa: Claims to law and custom in protecting and patrolling relations of gender and sexuality, by Oliver Phillips, 134-157.
8.   Abortion as treason: Sexuality and Nationalism in France, by Mindy Jane Roseman,  158-170

PART III: CONTEMPORARY NATIONAL CONCERNS

9.  Wanja Muguongo in Conversation with Alice M. Miller: Interview, pp. 173-184
10.  Criminal law, activism, and sexual and reproductive justice: What we can learn from the sex selection campaign in India, by Geetanjali Misra and Vrinda Marwah, 185-198
11.  Poisoned Gifts: Old moralities under new clothes? by Esteban Restrepo Saldarriaga. 199-219
12.  The Filth they bring: Sex panics and racial others in Lebanon, by Rasha Moumneh, 220-232.
13.   Objects in political mirrors may not be what they appear, by Scott Long,  233-247
14.   Harm Production: An Argument for Decriminalization, by Joanna N. Erdman, 248-268.
Notes, List of Contributors, Index, and Acknowledgments.

Beyond Virtue and Vice:  Rethinking Human Rights and Criminal Law
ed.  Alice M. Miller and Mindy Jane Roseman,  Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019)  360 pages.
Book abstract.    Intro and excerpts from pp. 3-55 online.

Related resources:

Stigmatized Meanings of Criminal Abortion Law’ by Rebecca J. Cook, in: RJ Cook, JN Erdman and BM Dickens (eds), Abortion Law in Transnational Perspective: Cases and Controversies (University of Pennsylvania Press 2014).  Article abstract.  Table of Contents.

[U.K.]”The Decriminalisation of Abortion: An Argument for Modernisation,” by Sally Sheldon.  Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, Vol. 36, No. 2 (2016), pp. 334–365   Institutional Access
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Compiled by: the International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, reprohealth*law at utoronto.ca.   See Program website for our PublicationsInformation resources, and Reprohealthlaw Commentaries Series.
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