REPROHEALTHLAW Updates – October 2018

October 31, 2018

SUBSCRIBE TO REPROHEALTHLAW: To receive these updates monthly by email, enter your address in upper right corner of this webpage, then check your email to confirm the subscription.

DEVELOPMENTS

Bulgaria:  Constitutional Court declares the Istanbul Convention against violence against women  unconstitutional.  July 27, 2018.  Oxford Human Rights Hub article.

Constitutional Court of Croatia.  Decision of March 2, 2017.  Rješenje Ustavnog Suda Republike Hrvatske, broj: U-I-60/1991 i dr. od 21.veljace 2017.  Decision online in Croatian. Backup copy.  Summary in English from CRR   Croatian Court’s Press release – 11 pages in English.

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS:

Fourth International Congress on Women’s Health and Unsafe abortion (IWAC 2019), February 19-22, 2019, Asia Hotel, Bangkok Thailand  Theme:  “We Trust Women: Universal Access to Safe Abortion.”  Submit abstracts by Nov 15, 2018  Call for Abstracts

SCHOLARSHIP:

Abortion Law in Transnational Perspective: Cases and Controversies, ed. Rebecca Cook, Joanna Erdman and Bernard Dickens (Philadelphia: Univ. Pennsylvania Press, 2014) Now in Paperback.  20% discount code: PH70.  English abstracts.   Spanish edition – abstractsTable of Cases in English or Spanish.

[Africa]  “(De)Criminalizing Adolescent Sex: A Rights-Based Assessment of Age of Consent Laws in Eastern and Southern Africa,” by Godfrey Dalitso Kangaude and Ann Skelton,  (peer-reviewed) Sage Open 2018 (Oct-Dec): 1-12.   Article online.

[Brazil – anencephaly – Supreme Court]   “The STF decision on abortion of anencephalic fetus: A Feminist Discourse Analysis” by Lucia Goncalves de Freitas, Alfa, Sao Paulo, 62.1 (2018): 11-33.   Article in English.

[Brazil – obstetric care, maternal mortality /morbidity, Alyne case]  “Implementing international human rights recommendations to improve obstetric care in Brazil,” by Alicia E Yamin, Beatriz Galli and Sandra Valongueiro.   International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 143.1 (October 2018): 114-120.    Download full text PDF now, because Free Access expires in 6 months.    Abstract online in English   For Portuguese abstract, click on :Supporting Information”.  

[Brazil – zika, microcephaly]  BOOK:  Zika: from the Brazilian backlands to a Global Threat (Zed Books, 2017)  in English  and  Portuguese .

[conscience]  “Balancing Freedom of Conscience and Equitable Access,” by Wendy Chavkin, Desiree Abu-Odeh, Catherine Clune-Taylor, Sara Dubow PhD, Michael Ferber and Ilan H. Meyer, American Journal of Public Health 108.11 (Nov 2018): 1487-88.  Article online.

[conscientious objection, Ireland] “Conscientious Objection, Harm Reduction and Abortion Care,”  by Ruth Fletcher, in Mary Donnelly and Claire Murray eds., Ethical and Legal Debates in Irish Healthcare: Confronting Complexities (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2016) pp. 24-40.  Pre-publication version.     Book information

[conscientious objection – South Africa “Let’s call ‘conscientious objection’ by its name: Obstruction of access to care and abortion in South Africa,” by Satang Nabaneh, Marion Stevens & Lucía Berro Pizzarossa,  24 October 2018, Oxford Human Rights Hub.

[Forced sterilization] “Gendered Power Relations and Informed Consent: The I.V. v. Bolivia Case,” by Martín Hevia and Andrés Constantin, Health and Human Rights JournalEarly view of full text.

[Intersex] “Management of intersex newborns: Legal and ethical developments,” by Bernard M. Dickens, International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics  143.2 (Nov. 2018): 255–259.  PDF at Wiley online.   Submitted text at SSRN.

[Ireland] “Reproductive Justice in Ireland: A Feminist Analysis of the Neary and Halappanavar Cases,” by Joan McCarthy,  in: Mary Donnelly and Claire Murray, eds., Ethical and Legal Debates in Irish Healthcare: Confronting Complexities (Manchester, UK: Manchester University Press, 2016).   Submitted Text online.   Book information

[Ireland and Britain] “Reproductive rebellions in Britain and the Republic of Ireland: contemporary and past abortion activism and alternative sites of care,” by Ben Kasstan and Sarah Crook, in Feminist Encounters: A Journal of Critical Studies in Culture and Politics, 2.2 (2018):  1-16.  Article online.

Annotated Bibliographies now available:  Right to Conscience
Fetal anomaly indication for abortion Rape or Incest abortion – English.  or Spanish)  Latin America:  Causal violación y/o incesto   (Toronto: International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, 2018).

US-focused news, resources, and legal developments are available  on Repro Rights Prof Blog.   View or subscribe.


JOBS

Links to employers in the field of Reproductive and Sexual Health Law are online here
______________
Compiled by the Coordinator of the International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, reprohealth*law at utoronto.ca For Program publications and resources, see our website, online here. TO JOIN THIS BLOG: enter your email address in upper right corner of this webpage, then check your email to confirm the subscription.

 

 

 

 


Irish Government announces referendum on abortion

January 31, 2018

Many thanks to Christina Zampas, our Reproductive Health Law Fellow,*  for preparing this expert comment for Reprohealthlaw subscribers.

On January 29, 2018. the Irish government announced that it will hold a referendum on the provision of the Constitution which limits abortion access. In deciding this, it took into consideration the recommendations issued on December 20 by the  Joint Committee of the Irish Parliament (the Oireachtas).

Ireland has one of the most restrictive abortion law regimes in the world, only allowing abortion in cases of risk to a woman’s life. The Joint Committee on the Eight Amendment of the Constitution was formed to review the  Citizens’ Assembly recommendations calling for constitutional reform of Article 40.3.3 (the Eighth Amendment) which guarantees an equal right to life of the “unborn” as to a pregnant woman.   The Eighth Amendment was inserted in the Constitution in 1983, after a bitterly contested referendum.  The intent of the Amendment was to halt the wave of liberalization of European and US abortion laws from hitting Ireland. An Amnesty International report shows how the Eighth Amendment fundamentally shaped the restrictive scope and content of Ireland’s abortion law and the quality of care received by all pregnant women and girls, not just women seeking abortion.

For three months in autumn, 2017, the Joint Committee assessed the Citizens’ Assembly recommendations and heard from scores of witnesses, including myself. I provided expert testimony on the impact of the Eighth Amendment on women and girls, the human rights violations resulting from such a draconian legal framework, and the practical reality that thousands of women from Ireland are accessing abortion either by travelling overseas or purchasing the abortion pill online.  As a result of this process, the Joint Committee recommended repeal of the Eighth Amendment, to align Ireland’s abortion law with human rights obligations and the laws of other European countries.  These recommendations will also guide the government in drafting a referendum proposal that will go to the people.  The Joint Committee’s recommendations include ensuring abortion on request in the first 12 weeks of gestation, and beyond 12 weeks for fatal fetal impairment, life and health, including mental and physical health.  They recognized that medical decisions are best made in a clinical setting, not by a legislature.  While most recommendations align with women’s and girls’ health care needs, human rights norms and the laws of other European countries, others do not–such as recommendations which do not recognize the need to allow on abortion on grounds of rape beyond 12 weeks gestation and which explicitly disallow abortion on grounds of severe fetal impairment.

The Joint Committee also made important ancillary recommendations which would prevent unwanted pregnancies and ensure quality of care to all pregnant women.  They include decriminalization of abortion (to reduce the chilling and stigmatic effect that criminal law has on provision of health care to all pregnant women), robust, evidence-based sex education, free access to contraception, equal access to high standards of obstetric care regardless of geography or socio-economic status, and improvements to counselling and support facilities surrounding pregnancy and abortion.

The government in announcing the referendum decided wording that effectively repeals the Eighth Amendment. Alongside this, the government announced that the Minister for Health will prepare legislation in line with the Joint Oireachtas Committee’s recommendations on abortion access, which includes a 12-week ‘on request’ period for abortion access.

This is a significant step for Ireland, where the abortion debate raged for decades with little government response until 2012, when the tragic and unnecessary death of Savita Halappanavar provoked large public protests.  Her death was due, in part, to the Eighth Amendment’s role in the clinical decision not to provide her with appropriate care during miscarriage.  This tragic case, combined with a judgment from the European Court of Human Rights in A, B and C v Ireland (2010), which had found Ireland in violation of the European Convention for lack of legal clarity on risk to life, the only ground on which women can access abortion,  the Protection of Life During Pregnancy Act (PLDPA) was passed in 2013.  This PLDPA replaced the 1861 Offences against Persons Act, a complete ban on abortion penalized by lifetime imprisonment.  Over 150 years later, the new law was limited by the Eighth Amendment and the Supreme Court’s interpretation (in Attorney General v. X (1992)) that the Constitution only permitted abortion where there is a “real and substantial risk to the life, as opposed to the health, of the mother.”  Within these confines, the 2013 law offers surprisingly little clarity on allowable circumstances and places formidable barriers, including multiple provider authorizations, to exercising the “life” exemption from criminal prosecution.  It continues to impose a criminal penalty on abortion: 14 years imprisonment.

The reformed law has changed nothing; every day, 10-12 women or girls travel from Ireland to England for an abortion.  These may include victims of rape, schoolgirls, women who cannot afford to have another child and those faced with fatal fetal diagnoses.  These women travel because they cannot access safe and legal abortion in Ireland.  Meanwhile, marginalized women, such as migrants, asylum seekers or impoverished women, are trapped in Ireland, unable to access abortion by travel.  For all these women and girls, their human rights are being violated, as criticized by international and regional bodies for over 20 years, most recently by the UN Human Rights Committee in Mellet v Ireland (2016) and Whelan v Ireland (2017)

Ireland’s draconian abortion law is part of its notorious history of strict punitive social controls over female sexuality, both in law and in practice, amid the socio-religious stigma that drove women and girls to the infamous “mother and child homes” or “Magdalene Laundries,” and subjected pregnant women to the medical practice of Symphysiotomy during childbirth.  It’s about time that such abuses and human rights violations are not only prevented from happening in the future but that the State recognized its role in this wrongdoing.

Related Links:

*Christina Zampas, a Reproductive Health Law Fellow in the International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Law and an independent human rights consultant, provided expert testimony on international human rights standards related to abortion to the Joint Committee on the Eighth Amendment to the Constitution on October 4, 2017  Video of testimony (at 2:27-2:45)

Ireland must comply with international human rights obligations, including HRC rulings in Whelan and Mellet cases, by Mercedes Cavallo Reprohealthlaw Blog, January 31, 2017.  Commentary online.

These are #115 and #116 in our Reprohealthlaw Commentaries Series. online here.

______________
Compiled by the Coordinator of the International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, reprohealth*law at utoronto.ca For Program publications and resources, see our website, online here. TO JOIN THIS BLOG: enter your email address in upper right corner of this webpage, then check your email to confirm the subscription.

 

 

 

 


“El sexo, las mujeres y el inicio de la vida humana en el constitucionalismo católico”, por Julieta Lemaitre Ripoll

October 31, 2017
[Catholic Constitutionalism on Sex, Women and the Beginning of Life]

El aborto en el derecho transnacional: Casos y controversias fue publicado en agosto de 2016 por el Fondo de Cultura Económica y el Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas.

Julieta Lemaitre Ripoll, “El sexo, las mujeres y el inicio de la vida humana en el constitucionalismo católico,” El aborto en el derecho transnacional: Casos y controversias, editoras/es  Rebecca J. Cook, Joanna N. Erdman, y Bernard M. Dickens (FCE/CIDE, 2016) págs. 306-331.    en españolen inglés.

La Conferencia Internacional de las Naciones Unidas sobre Población y Desarrollo de 1994, también conocida como Conferencia de El Cairo, provocó una vigorosa reacción de los conservadores católicos en contra de las propuestas feministas sobre la sexualidad y la reproducción. Desde entonces, los constitucionalistas católicos de todo el continente americano han manifestado su rechazo a las propuestas feministas en esos temas. Siguiendo instrucciones del Vaticano, este grupo ha luchado contra la liberalización de las leyes sobre el aborto, el matrimonio entre personas del mismo sexo y la investigación con células madre. Si bien algunos han citado explícitamente las escrituras bíblicas y a las autoridades religiosas, en los últimos años muchos han dejado de lado las referencias a su fe y, en cambio, utilizan argumentos jurídicos basados exclusivamente en la razón. Esta nueva estrategia de argumentación es un cambio significativo para el movimiento conservador católico, que se opone a los derechos sexuales y reproductivos.

En el decimo primer capitulo de El aborto en el derecho transnacional: Casos y controversias (FCE/CIDE, 2016), Julieta Lemaitre Ripoll explora la aparición del constitucionalismo católico en la normativa sobre el aborto. Esto es, el avance del razonamiento teológico católico en el discurso laico de los derechos humanos. Estimando que es crucial que la comunidad a favor del derecho de las mujeres a decidir considere esta línea argumentativa, Lemaitre estudia los argumentos constitucionales católicos sobre aborto y explora los efectos productivos de considerar esta línea, al exponer el orden moral implícito en las convicciones liberales y sus deficiencias, y al tender puentes hacia las preocupaciones católicas por la justicia social.

El aborto en el derecho transnacional: casos y controversias es disponible en español    en inglés   y dos capítulos en portugués: Capítulo 2.    Capítulo 4
Descargar: Reseña del libro en Andamios, por Diego Garcia Ricci      
Introducción y Prólogo.
Índice con resúmenes de otros capítulos

Tabla de Casos/Jurisprudencia en línea con enlaces a muchas de las decisiones judiciales
____________________________________

REPROHEALTHLAW:  Nuestras publicaciones en español o portugués.
Únete a este blog aquí.     Participe de este blog aquí.       Join REPROHEALTHLAW blog

 


“El derecho a la conciencia” por Bernard M. Dickens

October 31, 2017
[The Right to Conscience -by Bernard Dickens]

El aborto en el derecho transnacional: Casos y controversias fue publicado en agosto de 2016 por el Fondo de Cultura Económica y el Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas.

Bernard M. Dickens, “El derecho a la conciencia,” El aborto en el derecho transnacional: Casos y controversias, editoras/es  Rebecca J. Cook, Joanna N. Erdman, y Bernard M. Dickens (FCE/CIDE, 2016) págs. 270-305.
en españolen inglés.

En el decimo capítulo de El aborto en el derecho transnacional: Casos y controversias, Bernard M. Dickens explora las variantes del derecho humano a la libertad de conciencia en los debates sobre el aborto; enfocándose en la noción de que el derecho de actuar legítimamente de acuerdo con la conciencia del individuo no es monopolio de los opositores al aborto. El autor además afirma que el compromiso de los proveedores de abortos también esta protegido por el derecho a la conciencia; lo que los legitima a participar dichos procedimientos legales, asesorar a sus pacientes sobre esta opción, y derivarlas a los lugares donde estén disponibles los servicios. Es más, de la misma manera que los establecimientos de salud laicos deben reconocer el derecho a la objeción de conciencia de algunos proveedores, los establecimientos religiosos deben reconocer el derecho de los proveedores de abortos al compromiso moral de otorgar o disponer la prestación de abortos, y el derecho a la libertad de conciencia de las mujeres que reciben tales servicios.

El derecho humano de actuar legalmente y de acuerdo con su conciencia no es un monopolio de quienes se oponen al aborto. No obstante, en tanto derecho humano legalmente protegido, el derecho a la conciencia puede ser considerado principalmente como un derecho de los seres humanos del que podrían beneficiarse las instituciones corporativas, solo con carácter limitado. En este sentido, una persona puede alegar motivos de conciencia a la hora de participar o no participar en prácticas abortivas sin que por ello sea objeto de sanciones o discriminaciones fundamentadas en sus convicciones religiosas o filosóficas, siempre que informe y remita a las pacientes convenientemente.

El aborto en el derecho transnacional: casos y controversias es disponible en español    en inglés   y dos capítulos en portugués: Capítulo 2.    Capítulo 4
Descargar: Reseña del libro en Andamios, por Diego Garcia Ricci      
Introducción y Prólogo.
Índice con resúmenes de otros capítulos

Tabla de Casos/Jurisprudencia en línea con enlaces a muchas de las decisiones judiciales
____________________________________

REPROHEALTHLAW:  Nuestras publicaciones en español o portugués.
Únete a este blog aquí.     Participe de este blog aquí.       Join REPROHEALTHLAW blog

 


“¿Cómo puede un Estado ejercer control sobre la ingesta de una píldora?” por Sally Sheldon

October 31, 2017
[The Medical Framework and Early Medical Abortion in the U.K.:
How Can a State Control Swallowing? by Sally Sheldon
]

El aborto en el derecho transnacional: Casos y controversias fue publicado en agosto de 2016 por el Fondo de Cultura Económica y el Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas.

Sally Sheldon, “El marco de referencia médico y el aborto medicamentoso temprano en el Reino Unido. ¿Cómo puede un Estado ejercer control sobre la ingesta de una píldora?” El aborto en el derecho transnacional: Casos y controversias, editoras/es  Rebecca J. Cook, Joanna N. Erdman, y Bernard M. Dickens (FCE/CIDE, 2016) págs. 245-269.   en españolen inglés.

En el noveno capítulo de El aborto en el derecho transnacional: Casos y controversias, Sally Sheldon toma el caso del aborto temprano con medicamentos (es decir, no quirúrgico), considerado como un procedimiento rutinario en muchos países. Este es su punto central para explorar las ventajas y desventajas del marco normativo altamente medicalizado de la prestación de servicios abortivos en Gran Bretaña. Si bien este marco, arraigado en el derecho y altamente aceptado, ha contribuido a despolitizar y liberar significativamente el acceso al aborto, también ha obstaculizado otras maneras de considerar lo que está en juego en el debate sobre el aborto; particularmente, los derechos reproductivos de las mujeres. Sheldon analiza la vigencia del control medico, a pesar de la existencia de acciones judicial para revocar las restricciones clínicas sin fundamento sobre el uso de medicamentos abortivos, y la evidencia de otros países sobre la seguridad de su uso doméstico.
Las posibilidades que plantea el aborto temprano con medicamentos son importantes, cuando se trata de desafiar las concepciones en torno al aborto que hemos heredado y los marcos que lo regulan en la actualidad. La posibilidad de adquirir los fármacos en Internet pone al alcance de muchas mujeres opciones más seguras para abortar fuera del control médico. En el futuro, es factible que en muchas partes del mundo las disputas judiciales sobre aborto se centren en los procedimientos relativos a la autorización de fármacos, la regulación de la telemedicina y los  conflictos respecto de normativas y restricciones aduaneras. Si bien hace tiempo que el aborto es un delito difícil de detectar y enjuiciar, las dificultades que implican todo intento de regular el aborto temprano con medicamentos —o de contenerlo bajo un control médico estricto— serán notablemente mayores.

 

El aborto en el derecho transnacional: casos y controversias es disponible:
en español    en inglés   y dos capítulos en portugués: Capítulo 2.    Capítulo 4
Descargar: Reseña del libro en Andamios, por Diego Garcia Ricci      
Introducción y Prólogo.
Índice con resúmenes de otros capítulos

Tabla de Casos/Jurisprudencia en línea con enlaces a muchas de las decisiones judiciales
____________________________________

REPROHEALTHLAW:  Nuestras publicaciones en español o portugués.
Únete a este blog aquí.     Participe de este blog aquí.       Join REPROHEALTHLAW blog

 


“El papel de la transparencia en la reforma de leyes y prácticas del aborto en África” por Charles G. Ngwena

September 29, 2017
[For Abstracts of original English edition, click here]

El aborto en el derecho transnacional: Casos y controversias fue publicado en agosto de 2016 por el Fondo de Cultura Económica y el Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas.

Charles G. Ngwena, “El papel de la transparencia en la reforma de leyes y prácticas del aborto en África,” El aborto en el derecho transnacional: Casos y controversias, editoras/es  Rebecca J. Cook, Joanna N. Erdman, y Bernard M. Dickens (FCE/CIDE, 2016) págs. 218-242.    en españolen inglés.

El aborto inseguro, como consecuencia de la penalización, constituye un gran desafío para la salud pública y los derechos humanos de la región africana.  Charles Ngwena basa el noveno capitulo de El aborto en el derecho transnacional: Casos y controversias, principalmente, en sentencias emitidas por organismos de las Naciones Unidas, aunque también hace referencia a las sentencias de la Corte Europea de Derechos Humanos y de tribunales nacionales a fin de ilustrar el potencial del giro procesal para facilitar el acceso al aborto legal en África. El autor propone que responsabilizar al Estado por la falta de implementación efectiva de las causales legales existentes puede ser una herramienta jurídica importante para garantizar el acceso al aborto seguro. Así, considera que los Estados ya no pueden satisfacer los derechos humanos de los individuos simplemente legislando la diferencia entre un aborto legal y uno ilegal, sino que deben crear de manera activa medios identificables a través de los cuales las mujeres puedan tener acceso al aborto, y los proveedores puedan brindar servicios legítimos.

El autor explora si las guías técnicas sobre el aborto emitidas por los ministerios de salud en ciertos países de África cumplen con los estándares procesales. Explica también que su legitimidad tendría un carácter más sustancial si contaran con el apoyo de los ministerios de justicia y de las fiscalías, y con la garantía de que no perseguirán penalmente aquellos casos en que el aborto se llevó a cabo de manera segura, respetando los derechos y la dignidad de las mujeres.  Junto con la tendencia mundial de liberalizar el aborto —tendencia que se ha manifestado también en la región africana—, los esfuerzos por reformar las leyes y prácticas del aborto que buscan fomentar el acceso de las mujeres a abortos legales y seguros tienen que enfocarse en garantizar que las normas existentes sean implementadas con eficacia.  Mientras la penalización continúe siendo una realidad, responsabilizar al Estado por la falta de una implementación efectiva de las leyes existentes sobre el aborto puede constituir una herramienta jurídica importante para el desarrollo de un marco normativo que facilite el acceso al aborto seguro.

Hacia el final del capitulo, el autor explica los valores normativos que sustentan la transparencia como un imperativo de los derechos humanos.  De hecho, implementa la transparencia en la región africana, destacando su potencial transformativo y sus limitaciones dentro de un sistema jurídico que continúa penalizando el aborto mucho tiempo después de acabado el dominio colonial.  La transparencia no pretende reemplazar la lucha por la despenalización definitiva del aborto para que la autonomía reproductiva de las mujeres sea respetada.  Sin embargo, la transparencia es una manera de adoptar una estrategia jurisprudencial pragmática para la región africana, que permita trabajar en un entorno legal ampliamente restringido. Esto dado que aún deben ocurrir reformas radicales a las normas sobre el aborto, y aun no se han desarrollado sistemas de salud que permitan a profesionales de la salud de nivel intermedio otorgar servicios de aborto.

 

El aborto en el derecho transnacional: casos y controversias es disponible en español    en inglés   y dos capítulos en portugués: Capítulo 2.    Capítulo 4
Descargar: Reseña del libro en Andamios, por Diego Garcia Ricci      
Introducción y Prólogo.
Índice con resúmenes de otros capítulos

Tabla de Casos/Jurisprudencia en línea con enlaces a muchas de las decisiones judiciales
____________________________________

REPROHEALTHLAW:  Nuestras publicaciones en español o portugués.
Únete a este blog aquí.     Participe de este blog aquí.       Join REPROHEALTHLAW blog

 


“La lucha contra las normas informales que regulaban el aborto en Argentina,” por Paola Bergallo

September 29, 2017
[For Abstracts of original English edition, click here]

El aborto en el derecho transnacional: Casos y controversias fue publicado en agosto de 2016 por el Fondo de Cultura Económica y el Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas.

Bergallo, Paola, “La lucha contra las normas informales que regulaban el aborto en Argentina,” Capitulo 7 en El aborto en el derecho transnacional: Casos y controversias, editores/as Rebecca J. Cook, Joanna N. Erdman y Bernard M. Dickens (México, D.F.: FCE/CIDE, 2016).  187-217.  en españolen inglés.

Paola Bergallo analiza el giro procesal en el contexto argentino a través de la disputa entre el derecho formal y las normas informales del acceso al aborto. En su recuento, la autora demuestra que la oposición conservadora hace uso de normas informales socavando constantemente las causas legales para acceder a los servicios de aborto, lo que lleva a una prohibición de facto. Bergallo explica las dificultades de los ministerios, al utilizar guías técnicas de procedimiento y sentencias judiciales sobre implementación, para garantizar la provisión del aborto mediante el derecho formal. La autora explora las maneras en que esta lucha para implementar las indicaciones legales para el aborto podría llevar a un cambio gradual en la concepción del Estado de derecho, dando cuenta de un suelo fértil para avanzar hacia la despenalización. El capítulo demuestra que las guías no han superado aún los aspectos impracticables de la regulación del aborto mediante causales legales, y concluye que el giro procesal en Argentina quizá demuestre, en última instancia, que su mayor potencial yace en que refuerza la demanda normativa por la despenalización.

El aborto en el derecho transnacional: casos y controversias es disponible en español    en inglés   y dos capítulos en portugués: Capítulo 2.    Capítulo 4
Descargar: Reseña del libro en Andamios, por Diego Garcia Ricci      
Introducción y Prólogo.
Índice con resúmenes de otros capítulos

Tabla de Casos/Jurisprudencia en línea con enlaces a muchas de las decisiones judiciales
____________________________________

REPROHEALTHLAW:  Nuestras publicaciones en español o portugués.
Únete a este blog aquí.     Participe de este blog aquí.       Join REPROHEALTHLAW blog