Chile: Constitutional Tribunal upholds constitutionality of new abortion law

September 21, 2017

Many thanks to Carlos Herrera Vacaflor, LL.M., for providing the following overview of this historic decision in Chile.

Tribunal Constitucional Chile, STC Rol N° 3729(3751)-17 CPT,  Requerimientos de inconstitucionalidad presentados por un grupo de Senadores y Diputados, respecto de normas del proyecto de ley que regula la despenalización de la interrupción voluntaria del embarazo en tres causales, correspondiente al boletín N° 9895-11.  Decision in Spanish: 295 pagesAccompanying documentsOther Submissions

On August 21, 2017, the Constitutional Tribunal of Chile, in a 6 to 4 ruling, upheld the constitutionality of a Bill (now enacted into law) that decriminalizes abortion in three cases: rape, fatal fetal impairment and when a woman’s life is in danger.

The Tribunal based its ruling on the following guiding principles, among others. On the basis of international human rights treaties ratified by Chile and national legal developments on maternity, the Tribunal recognized that pregnancy affects the physical and psychological integrity of a woman, since a fetus occupying a woman’s body causes physical and physiological transformations.  Furthermore, the Tribunal stated that criminal law on abortion imposes severe restrictions on rights, and leads to social and legal condemnation of individuals. The Tribunal, given such punitive power, recognized that criminal law should only be considered as an instrument of last resort, in order to limit the restrictive effect the law has on rights.

The Tribunal interpreted “threat to the life of the woman” as a risk to her life (riesgo vital). Only the physician who provides the abortion is needed to diagnose the risk to the woman’s life; no further examinations are required, lest the provision of care be delayed. Abortion is also decriminalized when the fetus carries a fatal congenital or genetic impairment impeding its survival outside the womb. The Tribunal maintained that since the Bill requires that two specialist physicians diagnose the disease of the fetus, these professionals must avoid decisional paralysis that could put a woman in greater danger. In cases of rape, the Tribunal considered constitutional the limits on access to abortion: for girls under the age of 14, abortion must be performed before 14 weeks of gestation; if the victim is older than 14, before 12 weeks of gestation.

The Tribunal also recognized, by an 8 to 2 vote, the constitutionality of institutional conscientious objection. The Tribunal found institutional conscientious objection also constitutional. Given the lack of uniformity on whether artificial legal “persons” (such as hospitals or clinics) have a right to conscience and religion in the Inter-American System of Human Rights, the Tribunal decided to elaborate its own position. The Tribunal considered it arbitrary to limit the scope of conscientious objection only to professionals intervening in abortion care. It argued that freedom of conscience and religion is protected for all persons in the Constitution and that, under comparative case law, educational institutions and private associations have been recognized as conscientious objectors in the context of education.

Full texts of Decision and Submissions:  Decision in Spanish -295 pagesAccompanying documentsOther Submissions

Chilean law professors who addressed the Court included:
   Prof. Veronica Undurraga  presentation  in Spanish.
Prof. Lidia Casas Becerra  
presentation in Spanish, at minute 42.

Amicus curiae brief re: International consensus on abortion law with respect to decriminalization, by Joanna Erdman and Rebecca Cook:
Spanish and English briefs in one PDF.

Amicus curiae brief re conscience and conscientious objection by Prof. Bernard M. Dickens:  English PDF    Spanish PDF.

“Chile Celebrates its First Steps Towards Fulfilling Abortion Rights,” by Lidia Casas and Lieta Vivaldi, on Health and Human Rights Journal website.   Blogpost in English

Press Release from Center for Reproductive Rights.  Online in English.

Newspaper report in English.

——————————

SUBSCRIBE TO REPROHEALTHLAW: To receive these updates monthly by email, enter your address in upper right corner of this webpage, then check your email to confirm the subscription.


REPROHEALTHLAW Updates — July/August 2017

August 31, 2017

SUBSCRIBE TO REPROHEALTHLAW: To receive these updates monthly by email, enter your address in upper right corner of this webpage, then check your email to confirm the subscription.

DEVELOPMENTS
[Chile] Abortion legalized in three cases: when the woman’s life is at risk, when the fetus will not survive the pregnancy, and in case of rape).  New law ruled constitutional by the Constitutional Court of Chile on August 28, 20176:  STC Rol N° 3729(3751). Requerimientos de inconstitucionalidad presentados por un grupo de Senadores y Diputados, respecto de normas del proyecto de ley que regula la despenalización de la interrupción voluntaria del embarazo en tres causales, correspondiente al boletín N° 9895-11.  Tribunal Constitucional Chile.  Decision in Spanish -295 pagesAccompanying documentsOther Submissions  Newspaper report in English.    Overview by Carlos Herrera, LL.M.
Many Chilean law professors addressed the Court, including:
   Prof. Veronica Undurraga  presentation online.
Prof. Lidia Casas Becerra  
presentation begins at minute 42:00

[United Nations – CEDAW] General Recommendation 35,  Committee on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, (CEDAW) concerns gender-based violence against women, updating General Recommendation 19 (1992). e.g.: “Violations of women’s sexual and reproductive health and rights, such as forced sterilizations, forced abortion, forced pregnancy, criminalisation of abortion, denial or delay of safe abortion and post-abortion care, forced continuation of pregnancy, abuse and mistreatment of women and girls seeking sexual and reproductive health information, goods and services, are forms of gender-based violence that, depending on the circumstances, may amount to torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment.” (Art. 18)  Calls for repeal of ” legal provisions that discriminate against women,”(Art. 31) including “legislation that criminalises abortion” (31a).  Advance Unedited version of Gen. Rec. 35, 24 July 2017

CALL FOR PAPERS:
Feminist Legal Theory Collaborative Research Network, for the Law and Society Annual Meeting in Toronto, Canada, June 7-10, 2018, on the theme: “Law at the Crossroads”  500-word abstracts due Sept 17, 2017 Submission link.   Detailed call for papers  Pre-formed panels or ideas are welcome at:  2018lsacrn at gmail.com.

RESOURCES
Abortion Law in Transnational Perspective: Cases and Controversies, ed. Rebecca J. Cook, Joanna N. Erdman and Bernard M. Dickens (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014), now also in Spanish (see next entry) and in paperback, 20% discount code PH70.  English edition from U Penn PressTable of Contents with chapter summaries.  Table of Cases.

El aborto en el derecho transnacional: casos y controversias,  ed. Rebecca J. Cook, Joanna N. Erdman y Bernard M. Dickens (Mexico: FCE/CIDE, 2016)   En espanol, 2016: Fondo de Cultura Económica Libreria CIDE.     Índice con resúmenes de capítulos 1-5
Tabla de Casos/Jurisprudencia en línea con enlaces a muchas de las decisiones judiciales

[abortion law] Amicus curiae brief on international legal consensus  on abortion law reform, non-arbitrariness and proportionality, and grounds and procedural protections. 20 pp, submitted to the Tribunal Constitucional of Chile by Professors Joanna Erdman and Rebecca Cook, August 10, 2017.   Spanish and English PDF

[abortion law, Ireland] “The Protection of Life During Pregnancy Act 2013: Suicide, Dignity and the Irish Discourse on Abortion”, by Claire Murray, Social and Legal Studies 25.6 (Dec 2016): 667-698   PDF onlineAccepted version.

[abortion, Uganda] “Access to safe abortion in Uganda: Leveraging Opportunities through the Harm Reduction Model” by Moses Mulumba, Charles Kiggundu, Jacqueline Nassimbwa and Noor Musisi Nakibuuka, International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 138 (Aug. 2017): 231–236. doi:10.1002/ijgo.12190   PDF temporarily online for 12 months Submitted text online at SSRN.

[Africa] “The African Commission on Human and People’s Rights and the Woman Question”, by Ebenezer Durojaye and O. Oluduro, Feminist Legal Studies (2016) 24: 315-336  Abstract and article.

[conscientious objection] Amicus curiae brief  on conscientious objection by Professor Bernard Dickens submitted to the Tribunal Constitucional of Chile, August 10, 2017  English PDF     Spanish  PDF

NEWS
[abortion drug, Canada]: “Mifegymiso” (a combination of two abortion pills: mifepristone and misoprostol RU-486), approved by Health Canada in 2015, is now available free of charge in Ontario through pharmacies by prescription from physicians and nurse practitioners  News article.

International news and resources for advocacy:  International Campaign for Women’s Right to Safe Abortion.

US-focused news, resources, and legal developments are available on Repro Rights Prof Blog.  View or subscribe.

JOBS
Links to employers in the field of Reproductive and Sexual Health Law are online here

______________
Compiled by the Coordinator of the International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, reprohealth*law at utoronto.ca For Program publications and resources, see our website, online here. TO JOIN THIS BLOG: enter your email address in upper right corner of this webpage, then check your email to confirm the subscription.


Uganda: Harm reduction model for access to safe abortion

August 31, 2017

Congratulations and thanks to Moses Mulumba and his colleagues at the Center for Health, Human Rights and Development (CEHURD) in Kampala for collaborating with Dr. Charles Kiggundu, a gynecologist and obstetrician, on a newly published article in the Legal and Ethical Issues section of the International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

Access to safe abortion in Uganda: Leveraging Opportunities through the Harm Reduction Model” by Moses Mulumba, Charles Kiggundu, Jacqueline Nassimbwa and Noor Musisi Nakibuuka, International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 138 (August 2017): 231–236.  PDF free online for 12 months Submitted text  online at SSRN.

Access to safe and legal abortion services is a far reach for women and girls in Uganda. Although unsafe abortion rates have fallen from 54 to 39 per 1000 women aged 15-45 years over a decade, absolute figures show a rise from 294 000 in 2003 to 314,000 women having unsafe abortions in 2013.  Unfortunately, only 50% of the women who develop abortion complications are able to reach facilities for post-abortion care.  Despite the clinical evidence and the stories from undocumented cases, debate on access to safer and legal abortion is constricted, moralized, and stigmatized.  The harm reduction model has shown evidence of benefit in reducing maternal mortality and morbidity due to unsafe abortion while addressing related stigma and discrimination and advancing women’s reproductive health rights.  This article presents a case for promoting the model in Uganda.

Key words:  Abortion laws; Abortion policies and guidelines; Constitutional rights; Ethics; Harm reduction model; Human rights; Ugandan abortion law; Unsafe abortion


“‘Protection of Life during Pregnancy Act 2013’: Suicide, Dignity and the Irish Discourse on Abortion” by Claire Murray

August 31, 2017

Congratulations and thanks to Dr. Claire Murray of the School of Law, University College Cork in Ireland, for her useful article, published in a special issue of Social & Legal Studies,  guest-edited by Siobhan Mullally, on “Regulating Abortion: Dissensus and the Politics of Rights.”  We are pleased to circulate this abstract and links to the full text:

Claire Murray, “The Protection of Life During Pregnancy Act 2013: Suicide, Dignity and the Irish Discourse on Abortion”, Social and Legal Studies 25.6 (Dec 2016): 667-698   PDF onlineAccepted version.

Abortion is an issue that exposes deep divisions in Irish society and this was apparent during the debates on the Protection of Life During Pregnancy Act 2013.  This introduced a framework regulating abortion into Irish law for the first time, but maintained the existing position where abortion is only available where the life of the woman is at risk. This article focuses on the centrality of suicide within the Irish discourse on abortion and the impact this had on the shape of the legislation ultimately introduced, in particular the inclusion of a more onerous process with which a woman must engage before she can obtain an abortion where the risk to her life is from suicide.  It highlights the practical consequences of this for the small number of very vulnerable women in Ireland who will be required to engage with the new statutory process which is deeply damaging.  The 2013 Act reinforces the two-tier approach to healthcare that exists in Ireland in the specific context of reproductive healthcare, as those with sufficient resources will be able to bypass the difficult and undignified statutory procedure and those who lack the socioeconomic capital will be compelled to remain.
PDF onlineAccepted version.

Keywords:  Abortion, dignity, Ireland, regulation, risk to life, suicide.

See also:
Attorney General v. X, [1992] I.E.S.C. 1, (Supreme Court of Ireland) had decided that an attempt to prevent a 14-year old girl who was pregnant as a result of being raped, from traveling from Ireland to England in order to access abortion care was not justified.  She was at real risk of committing suicide. Decision online.

Re-imagined judgment of Attorney General v. X  by Ruth Fletcher, with Commentary by Sheelagh McGuiness, in: Northern/Irish Feminist Judgments: Judges’ Troubles and the Gendered Politics of Identity, edited by Máiréad Enright, Julie McCandless and Aoife O’Donoghue (Oxford: Hart, 2017)  This book re-imagines, re-writes and comments on 26 court decisions from feminist perspectives.  Table of Contents and details
Reprohealthlaw blog comments, and links to full text

A referendum on Irish abortion law has been promised before June 2018. Irish Times.

 

 

 

 

 


Un enfoque funcionalista al derecho comparado del aborto, por Rachel Rebouché

August 31, 2017
[For Abstracts of original English edition, click here]

El aborto en el derecho transnacional: Casos y controversias fue publicado en agosto de 2016 por el Fondo de Cultura Económica y el Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas.

Rachel Rebouché, “Un enfoque funcionalista al derecho comparado del aborto,” El aborto en el derecho transnacional: Casos y controversias, editoras/es  Rebecca J. Cook, Joanna N. Erdman, y Bernard M. Dickens (FCE/CIDE, 2016) págs. 131-156.
en españolen inglés.

Los tribunales de países tan diversos como Portugal, Sudáfrica, México y Colombia han usado el derecho comparado para ponderar los derechos de las mujeres con la vida por nacer, así como para posicionar sus sentencias dentro de un espectro de regímenes jurídicos sobre el aborto. El método utilizado actualmente se basa en las sentencias constitucionales sobre el aborto —emblemáticas pero anticuadas— de los Estados Unidos y Alemania. La debilidad de la metodología es que la reforma a las normas sobre el aborto es evaluada y legitimada en relación con una serie de derechos altamente elaborados y abstractos que están delimitados por lo que las sentencias de los Estados Unidos y Alemania han llegado a representar. Los logros de la reforma a las normas sobre el aborto en la práctica —ya sea en cuanto a su acceso, prohibición o algún punto intermedio— no se evalúan ni de manera comparada, ni de ninguna otra forma.

En el quinto capitulo de El aborto en el derecho transnacional: Casos y controversias, Rachel Rebouché cuestiona los costos de seguir priorizando la relación entre principios constitucionales y regímenes normativos, en lugar de analizar la relación entre el derecho y la práctica.  La autora expone, de manera convincente, que las formas legislativas o las normas constitucionales no son las que determinan la práctica del aborto, sino que ésta depende de una compleja relación entre las reglas formales, informales y de fondo, por lo que propone una metodología funcionalista alternativa para capturar este complejo sistema de reglas y analizar su impacto en el acceso a los servicios.

El aborto en el derecho transnacional: casos y controversias es disponible en español    en inglés   y dos capítulos en portugués: Capítulo 2.    Capítulo 4
Descargar: Reseña del libro en Andamios, por Diego Garcia Ricci      
Introducción y Prólogo.
Índice con resúmenes de otros capítulos

Tabla de Casos/Jurisprudencia en línea con enlaces a muchas de las decisiones judiciales
____________________________________

REPROHEALTHLAW:  Nuestras publicaciones en español o portugués.
Únete a este blog aquí.     Participe de este blog aquí.       Join REPROHEALTHLAW blog

 


La proporcionalidad en el control de constitucionalidad de las normas sobre aborto, por Verónica Undurraga

August 31, 2017
[For Abstracts of original English edition, click here]

Los tribunales se han tornado cada vez más sensibles a la necesidad de tomar posturas menos categóricas que reconozcan los intereses en conflicto y busquen una solución mediante un razonamiento más ponderado. A medida que las sentencias constitucionales sobre el aborto evolucionan, los tribunales buscan experimentar con diferentes marcos jurídicos a través de los cuales articular su razonamiento.

Verónica Undurraga, “El principio de proporcionalidad en el control de constitucionalidad de las normas sobre el aborto,” El aborto en el derecho transnacional: Casos y controversias, editoras/es  Rebecca J. Cook, Joanna N. Erdman, y Bernard M. Dickens (FCE/CIDE, 2016) págs. 107-130.  Disponible en español,  en inglés, y en português

En el cuarto capitulo de  El aborto en el derecho transnacional: Casos y controversias, Verónica Undurraga se aboca expresamente a la metodología judicial en el derecho constitucional sobre el aborto, enfocándose en la proporcionalidad como marco analítico, introducido en la sentencia constitucional alemana de 1975 y refinado por sentencias mas recientes en Europa y Latinoamérica, que permite a los tribunales ir más allá de la toma de decisiones abstracta e intuitiva, característica de las sentencias sobre el aborto en el pasado.

Allí, la autora explora el principio de proporcionalidad como una metodología que, aplicada por tribunales, ha dado lugar a un tratamiento constitucional más balanceado del aborto, reduciendo la unilateralidad y produciendo sentencias mejor justificadas.  La proporcionalidad, explica Undurraga, considera temas sustantivos muchas veces ignorados en fallos sobre el aborto, y compele a los jueces a evaluar no solamente la base lógica, sino también el impacto de la penalización; esto es, evalúa si la protección que brinda a la vida del feto justifica el sacrificio que exige a las mujeres.  Como metodología, la proporcionalidad exige a los jueces que ordenen en etapas consecutivas las cuestiones que deben abordar, y los alienta a reflexionar sobre ciertos temas sustanciales que muchas veces se ven desatendidos en los fallos sobre el aborto. Por ejemplo, requiere que los jueces, además de declarar que la protección de la vida por nacer es un deber constitucional o un interés jurídicamente relevante, evalúen la efectividad de la norma penal para proveer esta protección.

El principio de la proporcionalidad obliga a explicitar los beneficios y los costos asociados a la protección de la vida prenatal y a cuestionarse cómo están distribuidos dichos costos. Hasta el momento, las mujeres han soportado estos costos de manera desproporcionada, lo que limita sus derechos constitucionales. Cuando se incorporan estas consideraciones en el análisis judicial y se les da la debida atención, por lo común se observa una preferencia judicial por enfoques alternativos a la regulación penal del aborto.

Hacia el final del capitulo, Undurraga trata un aspecto especialmente desafiante del análisis de proporcionalidad de las normativas constitucionales sobre el aborto: la manera en que los tribunales han conciliado la obligación positiva de proteger la vida del que está por nacer con su obligación negativa de abstenerse de interferir en los derechos de las mujeres.

El aborto en el derecho transnacional: casos y controversias es disponible en español    en inglés   y dos capítulos en portugués: Capítulo 2.    Capítulo 4
Descargar: Reseña del libro en Andamios, por Diego Garcia Ricci      
Introducción y Prólogo.
Índice con resúmenes de otros capítulos

Tabla de Casos/Jurisprudencia en línea con enlaces a muchas de las decisiones judiciales
____________________________________

REPROHEALTHLAW:  Nuestras publicaciones en español o portugués.
Únete a este blog aquí.     Participe de este blog aquí.       Join REPROHEALTHLAW blog

 


Eslovaquia: “Los derechos de las mujeres en las sentencias sobre aborto” por Adriana Lamačková

August 31, 2017
[For Abstracts of original English edition, click here]

El aborto en el derecho transnacional: Casos y controversias fue publicado en agosto de 2016 por el Fondo de Cultura Económica y el Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas.  Los primeros cinco capitulos  exploran “Valores Constitucionales y Regímenes Normativos” ilustrando como las cortes constitucionales europeas abandonaron la presunción de que los derechos de las mujeres están en conflicto con el feto. El capitulo de Reva Siegel “La constitucionalización del aborto” (resumen aqui) provee un panorama de esta tendencia, seguido por dos capítulos de países específicos. A continuación se encuentra el resumen del segundo de ellos.

Adriana Lamačková   “Los derechos de las mujeres en las sentencias sobre aborto del Tribunal Constitucional de Eslovaquia, Capítulo 3 en El aborto en el derecho transnacional: Casos y controversias, editoras/es  Rebecca J. Cook, Joanna N. Erdman, y Bernard M. Dickens (FCE/CIDE, 2016) págs. 82-106. Ahora disponible en español  y en inglés.

En 2007, el Tribunal Constitucional de la República Eslovaca falló que el aborto a petición de la mujer esta en consonancia con la obligación constitucional de proteger la vida humana por nacer.1 La cuestión de la compatibilidad entre una ley de aborto liberal y el derecho a la vida no es nuevo en el derecho constitucional europeo. Una vez terminado el socialismo de Estado, los tribunales constitucionales de Europa Central, incluidas Alemania, Hungría y Polonia, cuestionaron y respondieron esta cuestión.2 Sin embargo, el tribunal eslovaco es el único de la región que validó el aborto a petición haciendo referencia a ambas obligaciones del Estado, tanto de proteger la vida humana por nacer como de respetar el derecho de las mujeres a la autodeterminación reproductiva. Validando nuevamente la congruencia del régimen de consejería con el derecho a la vida del feto, esta sentencia es especialmente significativa en la región puesto que no considera la protección de la vida del feto como el único, o incluso el principal, derecho en las normativas constitucionales sobre el aborto. El derecho de las mujeres a la autodeterminación reproductiva goza de la misma posición plena y equitativa en el orden constitucional. Lamaĉková atribuye este cambio jurisprudencial a que la corte utiliza el equilibrio como marco analítico, según el cual se validan diversos derechos y principios constitucionales, sin que ninguno de ellos anule por completo a los otros, favoreciendo la concesión en vez de la regulación absoluta.  La sección final del capitulo describe brevemente el desarrollo legislativo posterior al fallo, los cambios en el discurso y los argumentos antiaborto relacionados con el fallo en el contexto eslovaco.

El tercer capitulo de El aborto en el derecho transnacional: Casos y controversias ilustra como los valores constitucionales pueden usarse para reformas las leyes de aborto en el mundo. El fallo del tribunal eslovaco, al conceder pleno reconocimiento y efectividad a los derechos de las mujeres, refleja un cambio fundamental en la regulación constitucional europea del aborto, también explorado en capítulos anteriores como “La constitucionalización del aborto,” por Reva Siegel, y “El aborto en Portugal: Nuevas tendencias en el constitucionalismo europeo” por Ruth Rubio-Marín.

El aborto en el derecho transnacional: casos y controversias es disponible en español    en inglés   y dos capítulos en portugués: Capítulo 2.    Capítulo 4
Descargar: Reseña del libro en Andamios, por Diego Garcia Ricci      
Introducción y Prólogo.
Índice con resúmenes de otros capítulos

Tabla de Casos/Jurisprudencia en línea con enlaces a muchas de las decisiones judiciales
____________________________________

REPROHEALTHLAW:  Nuestras publicaciones en español o portugués.
Únete a este blog aquí.     Participe de este blog aquí.       Join REPROHEALTHLAW blog