“Theorizing Time in Abortion Law” by Joanna N. Erdman

June 29, 2017

Congratulations and thanks to Alicia Ely Yamin, Paola Bergallo, and Marge Berer, guest editors of the Health and Human Rights Journal, issue 19.1,  for their wide-ranging special section on “Abortion and Human Rights” (Table of Contents below), including this article by Prof. Joanna Erdman, MacBain Chair in Health Law and Policy at the University of Dalhousie’s Schulich School of Law:

Joanna N. Erdman, “Theorizing Time in Abortion Law and Human Rights,” Health and Human Rights 19.1 (June 2017): 29-40. HTML | PDF

The legal regulation of abortion by gestational age, or length of pregnancy, is a relatively undertheorized dimension of abortion and human rights. Yet struggles over time in abortion law, and its competing representations and meanings, are ultimately struggles over ethical and political values, authority and power, the very stakes that human rights on abortion engage. This article focuses on three struggles over time in abortion and human rights law: those related to morality, health, and justice. With respect to morality, the article concludes that collective faith and trust should be placed in the moral judgment of those most affected by the passage of time in pregnancy and by later abortion—pregnant women. With respect to health, abortion law as health regulation should be evidence-based to counter the stigma of later abortion, which leads to overregulation and access barriers. With respect to justice, in recognizing that there will always be a need for abortion services later in pregnancy, such services should be safe, legal, and accessible without hardship or risk.  At the same time, justice must address the structural conditions of women’s capacity to make timely decisions about abortion, and to access abortion services early in pregnancy.

“Abortion and Human Rights” section in Health and Human Rights Journal 19.1:
Contents page.

Narratives of Essentialism and Exceptionalism: The Challenges and Possibilities of Using Human Rights to Improve Access to Safe AbortionAlicia Ely Yamin and Paola Bergallo  HTML | PDF

Abortion Law and Policy Around the World: In Search of Decriminalization  (Discussion) by Marge Berer   HTML | PDF

Theorizing Time in Abortion Law and Human Rights,   Joanna N. Erdman
HTML | PDF

The Dublin Declaration on Maternal Health Care and Anti-Abortion Activism: Examples from Latin America,  Lynn M. Morgan   HTML | PDF

Regulation of Conscientious Objection to Abortion: An International Comparative Multiple-Case Study,  Wendy Chavkin, Laurel Swerdlow, and Jocelyn Fifield  HTML | PDF

The Role of International Human Rights Norms in the Liberalization of Abortion Laws Globally, Johanna B. Fine, Katherine Mayall, and Lilian Sepúlveda   HTML | PDF

Pregnancy and the 40-Year Prison Sentence: How “Abortion is Murder” Became Institutionalized in the Salvadoran Judicial System,  Jocelyn Viterna and Jose Santos Guardado Bautista   HTML | PDF

Pregnancies and Fetal Anomalies Incompatible with Life in Chile: Arguments and Experiences in Advocating for Legal Reform,  Lidia Casas and Lieta Vivaldi   HTML | PDF

Legal Knowledge as a Tool for Social Change: La Mesa por la Vida y la Salud de las Mujeres as an Expert on Colombian Abortion Law, Ana Cristina González Vélez and Isabel Cristina Jaramillo   HTML | PDF

The Battle Over Abortion Rights in Brazil’s State Arenas, 1995-2006, by Marta Rodriguez De Assis Machado and Débora Alves Maciel    HTML | PDF

Abortion Rights Legal Mobilization in the Peruvian Media, 1990–2015, by Camila Gianella   HTML | PDF

The Moderating Influence of International Courts on Social Movements: Evidence from the IVF Case Against Costa Rica, by Julieta Lemaitre and Rachel Sieder   HTML | PDF

Why is a “Good Abortion Law” Not Enough? The Case of Estonia,  by Liiri Oja   HTML | PDF

Macro- and Micro-Political Vernaculizations of Rights: Human Rights and Abortion Discourses in Northern Ireland  by Claire Pierson and Fiona Bloomer  HTML | PDF

Exploring Legal Restrictions, Regulatory Reform, and Geographic Disparities in Abortion Access in Thailand  by Grady Arnott, Grace Sheehy, Orawee Chinthakanan, and Angel M. Foster    HTML | PDF

Decriminalization and Women’s Access to Abortion in Australia, by Barbara Baird   HTML | PDF

Australia: Abortion and Human Rights, by Ronli Sifris and Suzanne Belton   HTML | PDF

PERSPECTIVE Abortion Care in Nepal, 15 Years after Legalization: Gaps in Access, Equity, and Quality, by Wan-Ju Wu, Sheela Maru, Kiran Regmi, and Indira Basnett   HTML | PDF

 


The REPROHEALTHLAW Blog is compiled by the International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, Canada,  reprohealth*law at utoronto.ca and @reprohealthlaw.   For Program publications and resources, see our website, online here.
TO JOIN THIS BLOG: enter your email address in upper right corner of this webpage, then check your email to confirm the subscription


REPROHEALTHLAW Updates – June 2017

June 29, 2017

 SUBSCRIBE TO REPROHEALTHLAW: To receive these updates monthly by email, enter your address in upper right corner of this webpage, then check your email to confirm the subscription.

DEVELOPMENTS

[Ireland]  Siobhàn Whelan v. Ireland, Comm. No. 2425/2014:  Ireland 12/06/2017, U.N. Doc. CCPR/C/119/D/2425/2014 (UN Human Rights Committee), 12 June 2017, [Woman forced to travel to the UK for an abortion after fatal fetal abnormality diagnosis.  Abortion laws are “cruel and inhumane.”]   English decision.   Newspaper report. Press release from Center for Reproductive Rights.

[Northern Ireland]  R (on the application of A and B) v Secretary of State for Health, decision of  [2017] UKSC 41, June 14, 2017 (Supreme Court, U.K.) [ruled that girl from Northern Ireland, aged 15, was not entitled to NHS-funded abortion in England] Decision onlineComments by Sheelagh McGuinness and Keith Syrett.  Newspaper report.

RESOURCES

[abortion law: gestational age]  “Theorizing Time in Abortion Law & Human Rights,” by Joanna N. Erdman, in: Health and Human Rights Journal 19.1 (June 2017): 29-40.  Theorizing Time text. Download PDFSpecial issue on “Abortion and Human Rights.”

Abortion Law in Transnational Perspective: Cases and Controversies” ed. Rebecca J. Cook, Joanna N. Erdman, and Bernard M. Dickens (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014)  Penn Press (discount code: PH70).   Review by Francisca Pou Giménez.    Spanish edition: (FCE/CIDE, 2016)     Reseña por Diego Garcia Ricci.
Traduções para portugues:
Capítulo 2: “Aborto em Portugal: novas tendências no constitucionalismo europeu,” por Ruth Rubio-Marín, Revista Direito GV São Paulo 13.1(jan./abr. 2017): 356-379 DOI: 10.1590/2317-6172201714  Tradução para o português.
Capítulo 4: “O princípio da proporcionalidade no controle de constitucionalidade das leis sobre aborto, por Verónica Undurraga, Publicum 2.2 (2016)   Tradução para o português.

[abortion law, Spain]  “Gender in Constitutional Discourses on Abortion: Looking at Spain from a Comparative Perspective,” by Blanca Rodriguez-Ruiz, Social & Legal Studies 2016, Vol. 25(6) 699–715, DOI: 10.1177/0964663916668251. ” PDF for academic subscribers.    Submitted Version.  (from special issue on “Regulating Abortion: Dissensus and the Politics of Rights” by Siobhàn Mullally, (Introduction to special issue).

[conscientious objection, Latin America]  “Refusing Reproductive Health Services on Grounds of Conscience in Latin America:  Challenging policies and practises based on human rights standards,” by Diya Uberoi and Beatriz Galli in  SUR International Journal on Human Rights, 24 (Dec 2016)  [special issue on “Women: Movements, successes and obstacles” Overview.  English edition.    Spanish edition.    Portuguese edition.

—-See also:  Conscientious objection:  Articles and projects of the International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto.  Download Conscientious objection resources.

[contraception, Uganda]  “Controlling Women’s Fertility in Uganda,” by Sylvia Tamale in SUR International Journal on Human Rights, 24 (Dec 2016)  [special issue on “Women: Movements, successes and obstacles”]  English edition.   Spanish editionPortuguese edition.

“Female Genital Cutting (Mutilation/ Circumcision): Ethical and Legal Dimensions,” by  R. J. Cook,  B.M. Dickens, and M.F. Fathalla (2002) 79 International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics : 281-287.  English abstract and article.
new Turkish translation: “Kadın Sünneti (Sakatlama/Sünnet): Etik ve Hukuki Boyutlar,” trans. Mustafa Erçakıca, in Beykent Üniversitesi Hukuk Fakültesi Dergisi 2.4 (Dec. 2016): 111-121.  Turkish download.

“Gender Stereotyping in the Military: Insights from Court Cases,” by Rebecca Cook and Cornelia Weiss, in Stereotypes and Human Rights Law, ed. Eva Brems and Alexandra Timmer (eds.), (Antwerp, Belgium: Intersentia, 2016) 175-198.  Submitted text.    PDF (online after June 2018)  About the book.

US-focused news, resources, and legal developments are available on Repro Rights Prof Blog.  View or subscribe.

JOBS

Links to employers in the field of Reproductive and Sexual Health Law are online here

______________

Compiled by the Coordinator of the International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, reprohealth*law at utoronto.ca For Program publications and resources, see our website, online here. TO JOIN THIS BLOG: enter your email address in upper right corner of this webpage, then check your email to confirm the subscription.


REPROHEALTHLAW Updates – May 2017

May 26, 2017

 SUBSCRIBE TO REPROHEALTHLAW: To receive these updates monthly by email, enter your address in upper right corner of this webpage, then check your email to confirm the subscription.

DEVELOPMENTS

Argentina:  Juzgado Nacional en lo Criminal de Instrucción 16, Secretaría 111 de la Capital Federal, causa 28.580/2015, “M.N.N.”  (28 de Junio de 2016).  National Criminal Court held a woman and the doctors who prescribed her abortion medications, not guilty of any crime because the woman’s health was at risk. The woman was pregnant because her partner raped her.  English summarySpanish summary.   Download decision in Spanish.

Colombia:  Constitutional Court blocked sterilization of a disabled girl who was too young to consent.   English summarySpanish summary with link to decision.

India:   Indu Devi v the State of Bihar [2017] No(s.) 14327, decided May 9, 2017 (Supreme Court of India). Destitute HIV+ woman, pregnant from rape, refused abortion past legal limit of 20 weeks, but State held responsible for delay that prevented legal abortion.  Summary by H. Kofman forthcoming on this blog  Judgment onlineAbstract by law student H. Kofman

Uruguay:  Woman refused legal abortion after former partner intervenes.   Summary in EnglishSpanish summary with link to decision. Safe Abortion Campaign report.

CALLS

Gender Justice Uncovered Awards: Nominations for best and worst court decisions.  Many striking cases and decisions summarized, e.g., Argentina, Colombia and Uruguay decisions mentioned above.    Vote before May 31, 2017

Call for Submissions: “Gender Violence and International Human Rights Law” for the 2018 Human Rights Essay Award, organized by Academy on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law, Washington College of Law, American University, Washington DC.   Submission Information and form.

Open Call for Submissions, McGill Journal of Law and Health, peer-reviewed. Details and Editorial Guidelines.

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

Graduate study in Health Law now available at the Centre for Health Law, Policy and Ethics, University of Ottawa, currently accepting LLM and PhD applications on a rolling basis for the 2017-2018 academic year.    Brochure online.

RESOURCES

“Abortion by telemedicine: an equitable option for Irish women,” by Wendy V. Norman and Bernard M. Dickens,  BMJ May 16, 2017; 357 Article online.

[abortion, Canada] “A Constitutional Future for Abortion Rights in Canada,” by Joanna Erdman, Alberta Law Review 54.3(2017):727-752   Article online.

[abortion, Europe]  “Legal and Political Discourses on Women’s Right to Abortion,” by Christina Zampas,  chapter 1 in:  A Fragmented Landscape: Abortion Governance and Protest Logics in Europe, ed.  Silvia De Zordo, Joanna Mishtal, and Lorena Anton   (New York: Berghahn, 2016)  Details from Publisher

[abortion law] “Regulating Abortion: Dissensus and the Politics of Rights” by Siobhan Mullally, introduction to special issue of Social & Legal Studies: An International Journal, 2016, Vol.25(6) . Introduction online.

[abortion law]  “Book Review: Francisca Pou Giménez on Rebecca J. Cook, Joanna Erdman and Bernard M. Dickens’s Abortion Law in Transnational Perspective: Cases and Controversies”, on I-CONnect, Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law and Constitution Making, May 17, 2017  Book review online.   (Penn Press discount code: PH70).    Spanish edition, FCE/CIDE, 2016

[abortion law pedagogy] “The Social Life of Abortion Law: On Personal and Political Pedagogy,” by Nicky Priaulx, Medical Law Review 25.1(2017):73-98.  Download abstract and PDF.

[abortion travel]  “The Law of Stigma, Travel, and the Abortion-Free Island,” Columbia Journal of Gender & Law 33.1(2016): 29-37.  PDF online.

[conscience]  “Physicians, Not Conscripts — Conscientious Objection in Health Care,” by Ronit Y. Stahl and Ezekiel J. Emanuel, New England J Medicine 376 (April 6, 2017):  1380-85.  Full text for institutional subscribers

[Ireland]  The Citizens’ Assembly – Draft Bill [recommendations for Irish abortion law reform] by Lawyers for Choice, Human Rights in Ireland, April 25, 2017  Draft Bill online.

[Nigeria]  “Accountability for Maternal Healthcare Services in Nigeria,” by Onyema Afulukwe, International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 137.2(May 2017) 220-226.  Abstract.  PDF temporarily online for 12 months   Submitted text (typescript) online.

Northern/Irish Feminist Judgments: Judges’ Troubles and the Gendered Politics of Identity, edited by Máiréad Enright, Julie McCandless and Aoife O’Donoghue (Oxford: Hart, 2017)   re-imagines, re-writes and comments on 26 court decisions from feminist perspectives.  Our commentsTable of Contents and details

[South Africa]  Pregnancy Law in South Africa: Between Reproductive Autonomy and Foetal Interests, by Camilla Pickles (South Africa: Juta, 2017), (based on thesis from University of Pretoria,  Thesis abstract   Book details from publisher

US-focused news, resources, and legal developments are available on Repro Rights Prof Blog.  View or subscribe.

REPORTS

“The Law, Trials and Imprisonment  for Abortion in [individual countries].”  International Campaign for Safe Abortion.  MexicoArgentina,  Kenya .

JOBS

Associate Professor/Professor and Assistant Director, Center for Human Rights, Faculty of Law, University of Pretoria.  Position details.

Links to other employers in the field of Reproductive and Sexual Health Law are online here

______________
Compiled by the Coordinator of the International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, reprohealth*law at utoronto.ca For Program publications and resources, see our website, online here. TO JOIN THIS BLOG: enter your email address in upper right corner of this webpage, then check your email to confirm the subscription.


Noninvasive Prenatal Genetic Diagnosis

November 24, 2016

Congratulations to Prof. Bernard M. Dickens whose article, abstracted below, is now universally available.

Bernard M. Dickens, “Ethical and Legal Aspects of Noninvasive Prenatal Genetic Diagnosis,”   International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 124.2 (2014): 181-184. online here.

Abstract:  The new technology that will allow genetic testing of a fetus within the first trimester of pregnancy by isolating cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) in the mother’s blood raises a range of ethical and legal issues. Considered noninvasive, this test is safe and reliable, and may avoid alternative genetic testing by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling, which risks causing spontaneous abortion. Ethical and legal issues of cffDNA testing will become more acute if testing expands to fetal whole-genome sequencing. Critical issues include the state of the science or diagnostic art; the appropriateness of offering the test; the implications of denying the test when it is available and appropriate; disclosure and counseling following test results; and management of patients’ choices on acquiring test results. A challenge will be providing patients with appropriate counseling based on up-to-date genetic knowledge, and accommodating informed patients’ legal choices.  Full text is online here.

Related Reading:
Rebecca J. Cook, “Stigmatized meanings of criminal abortion law,” chapter 16 of Abortion Law in Transnational Perspective: Cases and Controversies (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014), 347-369, analyzes the decision of R.R. v. Poland (European Court of Human Rights),  which held that a woman in Poland should not have been denied access to genetic prenatal examinations which would have enabled her to decide whether or not to seek a legal abortion in Poland. Abstract of this chapter.   Book: Abortion Law in Transnational Perspective.   Libro: El aborto on el derecho transnacionalRR v Poland decision.

Bernard M. Dickens, “Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis and ‘Saviour Siblings’International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Vol. 88, pp. 91-96, 2005  is online here.

76+ other articles on Ethical and Legal Issues in Reproductive Health are on our Program webpage here.

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El aborto en el derecho transnacional: casos y controversias

October 27, 2016

      
libro-aborto-portada

por Rebecca J. Cook, Joanna N. Erdman

y Bernard M. Dickens, (editores)
(México, FCE/CIDE 2016).

El debate jurídico y judicial sobre el aborto ha tenido, a lo largo del siglo XX y principios del XXI, importantes revoluciones en su abordaje teórico y práctico, que son expresión de estrategias de sectores sociales, religiosos y políticos que en ocasiones resultan contrapuestas.

Éste es un completo balance dinámico sobre las nuevas transiciones actuales y posibles y los desarrollos jurídicos más significativos a nivel transnacional en el tema del aborto, y da cuenta del nuevo desarrollo conceptual que concibe la idea de que no sólo la sanción penal, sino también la amenaza de la sanción penal, ponen en riesgo derechos fundamentales de las mujeres.

“…. Libro de gran actualidad y de avanzada … los autores tratan el tema del aborto con maestría desde las más variadas vertientes como pobreza, marginación, exclusión social, salud pública, penalización y derechos humanos….es y seguirá siendo lectura obligada para operadores jurídicos, sociólogos, economistas, políticos pero sobre todo para cualquier persona interesada en el tema.”

Olga Sánchez Cordero,  Ministra en retiro de la
Suprema Corte de Justicia de la Nación (México)

Introducción y Prólogo a la edición en español,  y  Índice General en línea

Tabla de Casos/Jurisprudencia en línea con enlaces a muchas de las decisiones judiciales

De venta en línea y en librerías del Fondo de Cultura Económica.

Oportunidad: Si desea escribir una reseña para alguna revista académica latinoamericana,  por favor escriba a  reprohealth . law @ utoronto . ca para solicitar una copia del libro.

SUMARIO:

Prólogo a la edición en espanol, por Víctor Abramovitch

Introducción, por Rebecca J. Cook,  Joanna N. Erdman, y Bernard M. Dickens

VALORES CONSTITUCIONALES Y REGÍMENES NORMATIVOS

La constitucionalización del aborto, por Reva B. Siegel     Resúmen aqui

El aborto en Portugal. Nuevas tendencias en el constitucionalismo europeo, por Ruth Rubio Marín     Resúmen aqui      PDF en português.

Los derechos de las mujeres en las sentencias sobre aborto del Tribunal  Constitucional de Eslovaquia, por Adriana Lamačková   Resúmen aqui

El principio de proporcionalidad en el control de constitucionalidad de las normas sobre aborto, por Verónica Undurraga   Resúmen aqui   y PDF em português

Un enfoque funcionalista al derecho comparado del aborto, por Rachel Rebouché  Resúmen aqui

JUSTICIA PROCESAL Y ACCESO LIBERALIZADO

El giro procesal: el aborto en el Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos, por Joanna N. Erdman

La lucha contra las normas informales que regulaban el aborto en la Argentina, por Paola Bergallo

El papel de la transparencia en la reforma de leyes y prácticas del aborto en África, por Charles G. Ngwena

INTERPRETACIÓN Y REIVINDICACIÓN DE LOS DERECHOS

El marco de referencia médico y el aborto medicamentoso temprano en el Reino Unido.  ¿Cómo puede un Estado ejercer control sobre la ingesta de una píldora? por Sally Sheldon

El derecho a la conciencia, por Bernard M. Dickens

El sexo, las mujeres, y el inicio de la vida humana en el constitucionalismo católico, por Julieta Lemaitre Ripoll

El aborto en el debate público brasileño. Estrategias jurídicas del embarazo anencefálico, por Luís Roberto Barroso

Nepal, hacia una igualdad transformativa. El fallo Lakshmi Dhikta, por Melissa Upreti

 NARRATIVAS Y SIGNIFICADO SOCIAL

El tratamiento de las narrativas del sufrimiento inocente en el litigio transnacional del aborto, por Lisa M. Kelly

Narrativas sobre la personalidad jurídica del no nacido en la regulación del aborto, por Alejandro Madrazo

Significados estigmatizados del derecho penal sobre el aborto, por Rebecca J. Cook

Tabla de Casos/Jurisprudencia (en línea)

Tabla de legislación, tratados y otros instrumentos internacionales relevantes

 


Stigmatized Meanings of Criminal Abortion Law

December 18, 2015

Rebecca J. Cook, “Stigmatized Meanings of Criminal Abortion Law ” chapter 16 in Abortion Law in Transnational Perspective: Cases and Controversies, ed. Rebecca J. Cook, Joanna N. Erdman, and Bernard M. Dickens (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014) pp. 347-369, 450n-456n.  Ahora disponible en español.

In this final chapter of  Abortion Law in Transnational Perspective, Rebecca Cook examines how criminal abortion laws create stigma, and explores how legal reasoning can more fully acknowledge their stigmatizing harms.  The chapter begins by sketching the prevailing normative justifications for criminalizing abortion, and explores how these justifications create negative social meanings about women, which in turn reinforce the need for criminalization. She applies social psychology scholarship to better articulate the stigmatizing harms of criminalization of abortion. She then examines how formal criminal abortion laws, informal laws, and background rules are used to spoil the identity of abortion-seeking women.

Specifically, she analyzes how the European Court of Human Rights in R.R. v. Poland might have more effectively acknowledged the stigmatizing harms resulting from the application of Poland’s criminal abortion law in finding violations of R.R.’s rights to be free from inhuman and degrading treatment and to private life, and how it could have found a violation of R.R.’s entitlement to secure these rights without discrimination on grounds of sex. She concludes by explaining that the stigmatizing harms that degrade pregnant women with unintended pregnancies outweigh the reasons for regulating abortion though criminal law.

Abortion Law in Transnational Perspective: Cases and Controversies was first published in August 2014 by the University of Pennsylvania Press’s Studies in Human Rights Series.   Table of Contents and other information online. Ahora disponible en español.


REPROHEALTHLAW Updates: Developments, Events, Resources

August 17, 2015

REPROHEALTHLAW-L
August 17, 2015

SUBSCRIBE TO REPROHEALTHLAW:  To receive these updates monthly by email, enter your address in upper right corner of this webpage, then check your email to confirm the subscription.

DEVELOPMENTS:

UN Human Rights Council adopted 3 new resolutions in 29th session, July 2015 (available in 5 languages)

  1. Accelerating Efforts to Eliminate all Forms of Violence Against Women: Eliminating Domestic Violence.  A/HRC/29/L.16/Rev.1
    Resolution online- choose language.    Abstract and analysis of voting.
  2.  Strengthening efforts to prevent and eliminate child, early and forced marriage,   A/HRC/29/L.15  Resolution online.
  3.  Elimination of discrimination against women, A/HRC/29/L.10  Resolution online.  A/HRC/29/L.7/Rev.1  Resolution online.

EVENTS:

“Bioethics, Medical Ethics and Health Law,” UNESCO Chair in Bioethics 11th world conference, Royal Continental Hotel, Naples, Italy, October 20-22, 2015. Invitation and Call for Abstracts

El IV Congreso Latinoamericano Jurídico sobre Derechos Reproductivos Lima, Peru, November 2-4, 2015   LatinAmerican Legal Congress.

RESOURCES:

Abortion Law in Transnational Perspective:  Cases and Controversies, ed. Rebecca J. Cook, Joanna N. Erdman and Bernard M. Dickens, 16 chapters.  University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014, 482 pages. Purchase info: link to U Penn Press.
Table of Cases with links to decisions online here, with links to abortion-related Table of Contents and abstracts online here.  A Spanish edition was published in August, 2016.  Ahora disponible en español.

[abortion] ‘The regulatory cliff edge between contraception and abortion: the legal and moral significance of implantation’ by Sally Sheldon.  forthcoming in  Journal of Medical Ethics Preview article (slow link) Related blog.

[abortion]  “Denial of abortion in legal settings,” by Caitlin Gerdts, Teresa DePiñeres, Selma Hajri,  Jane Harries,  Altaf Hossain, Mahesh Puri, Divya Vohra,  Diana Greene Foster,   Open access article.  in Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care 41.3: Special issue on abortion.

[abortion] Who can provide abortion care? Considerations for law and policy makers. Ipas report, 2015

[abortion] Symposium: Special Issue: Intersections in Reproduction: Perspectives on Abortion and Assisted Reproductive Technologies, in  The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 43.2 pp. 174 – 430, Summer 2015   Abstracts and Previews or PDFs of the following articles
—Introduction:   Intersections in Reproduction: Perspectives on Abortion and Assisted Reproductive Technologies, by  Judith Daar and Kimberly Mutcherson.

— The Bad Mother: Stigma, Abortion and Surrogacy,  by Paula Abrams.

—Legal Change and Stigma in Surrogacy and Abortion, by John A. Robertson.

—Selective Reduction: “A Soft Cover for Hard Choices” or Another Name for Abortion?   by Radhika Rao.

—When Is an Abortion Not an Abortion? by Kimberly Mutcherson.

—Selection against Disability: Abortion, ART, and Access, by Alicia Ouellette

—Normalizing Disability in Families (pages 224–227) by Mary Crossley

—Non-Invasive Testing, Non-Invasive Counseling (pages 228–240) by Rachel Rebouché.

—Reproductive Information and Reproductive Decision-Making (pages 241–244) by Maxwell J. Mehlman.

—Disclosure Two Ways (pages 245–254) by Erin B. Bernstein.

—Distinctions in Disclosure: Mandated Informed Consent in Abortion and ART (pages 255–258) by Judith Daar.

—Eggs and Abortion: “Women-Protective” Language Used by Opponents in Legislative Debates over Reproductive Health (pages 259–269) by Sujatha Jesudason and Tracy Weitz.

—False Framings: The Co-opting of Sex-Selection by the Anti-Abortion Movement (pages 270–274) by Seema Mohapatra.

—The Triple System for Regulating Women’s Reproduction (pages 275–288) by June Carbone and Naomi Cahn.

—The Invisible Classes in High Stakes Reproduction (pages 289–292) by Michele Goodwin.

—Conceiving of Products and the Products of Conception: Reflections on Commodification, Consumption, ART, and Abortion (pages 293–306) by Jody Lyneé Madeira.

—Complexifying Commodification, Consumption, ART, and Abortion (pages 307–311) by I. Glenn Cohen.

—The Doctor’s Dilemma: Paternalisms in the Medicolegal History of Assisted Reproduction and Abortion (pages 312–325) by Kara W. Swanson.

—How to Escape the Doctor’s Dilemma? De-Medicalize Reproductive Technologies (pages 326–329) by Paul A. Lombardo.

—Expectant Fathers, Abortion, and Embryos (pages 330–340) by Dara E. Purvis.

—Respecting Intent and Dispelling Stereotypes by Reducing Unintended Pregnancy (pages 341–344) by Dawn Johnsen.

—Membership Has Its Privileges? Life, Personhood, and Potential in Discussions about Reproductive Choice (pages 358–362) by Jonathan F. Will.

NEWS:

Northern Ireland:  Belfast woman will go on trial for helping her daughter to have a medical abortion.  newspaper article.

Paraguay: 11-year old rape victim, denied abortion, gives birth by caesarean section. News article.    Advocacy strategy during the pregnancy- interview with Amnesty International’s Tarah Demant     New York Times interview

Russian Ministry of Health signs a cooperation agreement with the Russian Orthodox Church regarding access to abortion ASTRA news report

US-focused news, resources, and legal developments are available on Repro Rights Prof Blog. View or subscribe.

JOBS

Human Rights and Law Adviser,  UNAIDS, Geneva, Switzerland.  Apply by August 22, 2015.  Job details.

Links to other employers in the field of Reproductive and Sexual Health Law are online here

__________________________

Compiled by the Coordinator of the International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, reprohealth*law at utoronto.ca For Program publications and resources, see our website, online here.
TO JOIN THIS BLOG: enter your email address in upper right corner of this webpage, then check your email to confirm the subscription.