REPROHEALTHLAW Updates – August 2019

August 26, 2019

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COLLOQUIUM:

Overcoming Barriers to Safe Abortion in the African Region, 16-17 January 2020, at the University of Pretoria’s Centre for Human Rights. Details, funding, topics, and Call for Abstracts

DEVELOPMENTS:

El Salvador – Young woman acquitted of aggravated homicide after miscarriage in 2016. Evelyn Hernandez Cruz was released on appeal, July 10, 2019. News report.

Germany: Higher court overturns doctor’s conviction for “advertising” abortion among other health services, in light of recent legal reform. News report, July 3, 2019.

Kenya – Case of “JMM,” a teenager who died in 2015 after botched illegal abortion.  The High Court of Kenya at Nairobi, Constitutional and Human Rights Division, declared that abortion is permitted for rape victims. It also ruled that the Ministry of Health’s 2014 withdrawal of abortion “Standards and Guidelines” and abortion trainings for healthcare professionals, were arbitrary and unlawful. Federation of Women Lawyers (Fida – Kenya) & 3 others v Attorney General & 2 others; East Africa Center for Law & Justice & 6 others (Interested Party) & Women’s Link Worldwide & 2 others (Amicus Curiae) [2019] eKLR, Petition No. 266 of 2015.   Decision of June 11, 2019.   News report.    Press release by Center for Reproductive Rights.

Northern Ireland – U.K. bill to maintain Northern Ireland’s public services during governmental hiatus includes decriminalized abortion and same-sex marriage. Bill was signed into law July 24, 2019, to take effect October 22, 2019. Time Magazine: “After 158 Years.”

United Kingdom: Court of Appeal upholds legality of a buffer zone around a London abortion clinic.  Dulgheriu and Orthova v. the London Borough for Civil Liberties and The National Council for Civil Liberties [2019] EWCA Civ 1490, Case No: C1/2018/1699 Court of Appeal (Civil Division). (Decision of August 21, 2019Report by Safe Abortion.

United Nations, International Law Commission, UN 71st session, A/CN.4/L.935 May 15, 2019, adopted new edition of “Crimes against Humanity” treaty, which “removed the outdated definition of gender … [It] affirmed that the rights of women, LGBTIQ persons, and other marginalized groups are protected in international criminal law, which will have ripple effects across national laws and future legal mechanisms for years to come,” according to Jessica Stern et al. New edition of Treaty.

SCHOLARSHIP:

[abortion law, Brazil] “Why is decriminalization necessary?  by the Anis Bioethical Institute (Brasilia, 2019).  The booklet is now available in English, Spanish and Portuguese : scroll down on this webpage.

[abortion law, Chile ] “Criminalisation under scrutiny: how constitutional courts are changing their narrative by using public health evidence in abortion cases,” by Verónica Undurraga, Sexual and Reproductive Health Matters 2019;27(1) DOI: 10.1080/26410397.2019.1620552 Article and abstract

[abortion law, Mexico] “Motherhood or Punishment: The criminalization of abortion in Mexico.” English 57-page report, 2019, English executive summary. Based on “Maternidad o Castigo:  La criminalización del aborto en Mexico,”  (Mexico, GIRE, 2018)  Informe de 72 paginas

[abortion law – United Kingdom] “Female Autonomy, Foetal Personhood and the English Legal Stance on Abortion Practice,” by Sahra Paula Thomet, Queen Mary Law Journal 10 (2019): 27-50. Institutional Access.

[abortion pill – Canada] “To Solve Abortion Pill Prescription Problems, We need to Rethink the Prescription Itself” by Professor Joanna Erdman, Dalhousie Law School, July 17, 2019 Newspaper Comment.

[age-of-marriage, Mali] “A commentary on the African Court’s decision in the case APDF and IHRDA v Republic of Mali: why socio-cultural endemic factors of a society could never support arguments based on force majeure” by Giulia Pecorella,  International Law Blog, January 14, 2019.  Comment online. Decision PDF.

“Gender Equality, Norms, and Health” 5-part series in The Lancet Vol. 393 provides new analysis and insights into the impact of gender inequalities and norms on health, and opportunities to transform them. ArticlesGender Equality Norms and Health series.

“Integrating Gender Perspectives  in Gynaecology and Obstetrics: Engaging Medical Colleges in Maharashtra, India,” by Sangeeta Rege,  Padma Bhate-Deosthali, Pravin Shingare, Srinivas Gadappa, Sonali Deshpande, Nandkishore Gaikwad, and Shailesh Vaidya, International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 146 (2019): 132–138    PDF at Wiley OnlineSubmitted text at SSRN.

US-focused news, resources, and legal developments are available  on Repro Rights Prof Blog. View or subscribe.

JOBS

Links to employers in the field of Reproductive and Sexual Health Law are online here.
______________
Compiled by: the International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, reprohealth*law at utoronto.ca.   See Program website for our PublicationsInformation resources, and Reprohealthlaw Commentaries SeriesTO JOIN THE REPROHEALTHLAW BLOG: enter your email address in the upper right corner of our blog, then check your email to confirm the subscription.


African Colloquium: Overcoming Barriers to Safe Abortion, Jan. 16-17, 2020, University of Pretoria

August 26, 2019

Colloquium on Overcoming Barriers to Safe Abortion in the African Region, 16-17 January 2020 at the Centre for Human Rights, University of Pretoria, South Africa. Details, funding, topics, and Call for Abstracts

The Centre for Human Rights, University of Pretoria, South Africa, will host a colloquium on #SafeAbortion and realising women’s human rights from 16 to 17 January 2020. The colloquium is about developing responses to the persistence of unsafe abortion in the African region. The Centre invites abstracts on overcoming barriers to safe abortion in the #African region. The focus is two-fold: critically exploring laws, policies and practices that serve as barriers to access to safe abortion; and suggesting reforms to overcome the barriers in consonance with women’s human rights. The colloquium seeks to bring together scholars, practitioners and researchers from the African region and beyond working on various aspects of abortion. 

Abstracts must be sent by email to chrispine.sibande@up.ac.za by August 2019. Authors wishing to discuss ideas before submitting an abstract can contact the convenors: charles.ngwena@up.ac.za / edurojaye@uwc.ac.za.

Colloquium on Overcoming Barriers to Safe Abortion in the African Region, 16-17 January 2020, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
Details, funding, topics, and Call for Abstracts

________________
Compiled by: the International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, reprohealth*law at utoronto.ca.   See Program website for our PublicationsInformation resources, and Reprohealthlaw Commentaries SeriesTO JOIN THE REPROHEALTHLAW BLOG: enter your email address in the upper right corner of our blog, then check your email to confirm the subscription.  


India: Integrating gender perspectives in Ob/Gyn medical college curricula

August 26, 2019

Congratulations and thanks to Sangeeta Rege, Padma Bhate-Deosthali, Pravin Shingare, Srinivas Gadappa, Sonali Deshpande, Nandkishore Gaikwad, and Shailesh Vaidya. for their newly published article in the International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics section on Ethical and Legal Issues in Reproductive Health.” An abstract is provided below:

Integrating Gender Perspectives  in Gynaecology and Obstetrics: Engaging Medical Colleges in Maharashtra, India,” by Sangeeta Rege,  Padma Bhate-Deosthali, Pravin Shingare, Srinivas Gadappa, Sonali Deshpande, Nandkishore Gaikwad, and Shailesh Vaidya, International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 146 (2019): 132–138    PDF at Wiley OnlineSubmitted text at SSRN.

Abstract: Failure to acknowledge the impact of sex and gender differences affects the quality of health care provision, and is an impediment to reducing health inequities. Systematic efforts were initiated in Maharashtra, India for reducing these disparities by developing gender‐integrated curricula in undergraduate medical education between 2015 and 2018. A review of undergraduate obstetrics and gynecology curricula had indicated a lack of gender lens and focus on the reproductive rights of women. Based on these gaps, a gender‐integrated curriculum was developed, implemented, and tested with medical students. Significant positive attitudes were seen among male and female students for themes such as access to safe abortion; understanding reproductive health concerns and their complex relationship with gender roles; violence against women as a health issue; and sexuality and health. These results strengthened the resolve to advocate for such a curriculum to be integrated across all medical colleges in the state.

Keywords: Gender; Medical education; Reproductive health; Rights

Related Resources:

Ethical & Legal Issues in Reproductive Health: 90+ concise articles.

Conscientious Objection / The Right to Conscience – annotated bibliography, updated May 9 2019

Ethical Issues in Obstetrics and Gynecology (FIGO Guidelines 2015)  English, French and Spanish.

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Compiled by: the International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, reprohealth*law at utoronto.ca.   See Program website for our PublicationsInformation resources, and Reprohealthlaw Commentaries Series.
TO JOIN THE REPROHEALTHLAW BLOG: enter your email address in the upper right corner of our blog, then check your email to confirm the subscription.


Post-abortion care: new FIGO ethics guidelines

August 26, 2019

The Committee on Ethical and Professional Aspects of Human Reproduction and Women’s Health of the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) has recently published a new guideline.  Congratulations and thanks to all participating Committee members 2015-2018, Frank A. Chervenak (Chair), Leonel Briozzo, Bernard Dickens, Ralph Hale, Michael Marsh, Laurence B. McCullough, Hannah Motshedisi Sebitloane, Sanjay Gupte, who reviewed, approved, and agreed to be accountable for the final manuscript.

The statement is now available online through FIGO will also be published in the next edition of FIGO Ethical Guideline books.

 “FIGO Committee Statement: Ethical responsibilities in post‐abortion care”  International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 2019; 146: 269–270.  (FIGO, 17 July 2019) Post-abortion care ethical guideline.

1.   Background:

  1. Post‐abortion care may be required when a woman experiences abortion that is deliberately induced, by the woman herself or by another, or that occurs spontaneously. At a later stage of pregnancy, this may be defined as miscarriage. Deliberately inducing abortion may be lawful or unlawful, depending on locally prevailing laws.
  2. Physicians bear an ethical responsibility to render prompt assistance to anyone in need of medical care that they are able to provide, without discriminating regarding the lawful or other origin of the condition they treat. Much of the mortality associated with induced abortion is due to deficient post‐abortion care. Refusal or failure to render care appropriately constitutes professional misconduct.
  3. Delivery of post‐abortion care to professional standards is legitimate, necessary, and does not in itself implicate providers in another’s prior illegality or professional misconduct.
  4. Post‐abortion care is legally separate from any procedures that may have been undertaken deliberately to induce abortion. Post‐abortion care providers, such as in hospital or clinic emergency or gynecology departments, are ethically required to render indicated care promptly to meet patients’ needs, and bear no responsibility for others’ prior acts or omissions that caused the need for such care.
  5. A care provider who has a conscientious objection to participating in inducing abortion cannot invoke such objection to decline rendering clinically indicated post‐abortion care. As a provider of post‐abortion care, a care provider is not a participant, nor complicit, in another’s prior acts causing the need of such care.
  6. Safe management of post‐abortion care is a professional skill required of all qualified practitioners of obstetrics and gynecology. Training in the medical specialty requires inclusion of post‐abortion care.
  7. Like delivery of other forms of health care, post‐abortion care requires professional regard for patients’ physical and psychological or emotional health needs, that is for patients’ “physical, mental and social well‐being” (WHO definition of “health”).
  8. Some laws require that care providers report evidence of unlawful termination of pregnancy to law‐enforcement authorities.  Such laws violate medical professional duties of confidentiality and patients’ human rights, and require that providers reliably distinguish spontaneous from induced abortion, and between lawful and unlawful interventions in pregnancy.

2.  Recommendations

  1. Practitioners should promptly render indicated post‐abortion care that is within their means to patients, without regard to whether as individuals they conscientiously object to participation in induced abortion.
  2. Post‐abortion care should include emotional support for patients, and should be delivered in the same non‐judgmental, non‐stigmatizing way as other professional gynecologic services.
  3. On admitting patients to their post‐abortion care, practitioners should record whether they have rendered any prior individual professional services to such patients.
  4. Practitioners should ensure that the facilities in which they are engaged are adequately equipped—for instance with drugs, equipment, and trained personnel—to deliver timely professional care indicated for post‐abortion patients, including counseling and advice on birth control and contraception.
  5. Educational programs and professional certification in gynecology should require training and competence in post‐abortion care, disallowing students’ and candidates’ non‐compliance on grounds of conscientious objection to participation or complicity in induced abortion.
  6. Practitioners and professional associations should oppose and resist laws and proposed laws that compel practitioners to inform law‐enforcement authorities of post‐abortion patients’ identities, on grounds that such laws violate professional ethics and patients’ human rights to confidentiality, risk harmful misinformation, are unreliable for professionals to implement, and are dysfunctional in not deterring illegality but in deterring patients from promptly seeking indicated, necessary, lawful care.
  7. Service providers and managers of service facilities should be familiar with and observe the WHO statement Safe Abortion: technical and policy guidance for health systems,[1] especially Section 2.3 on post‐abortion care and follow‐up.
  8. Human rights agencies, both national and international, characterize neglect or limitation of health services that only women need as violating obligations to eliminate all forms of discrimination against women. Practitioners and facility managers should ensure compliance with non‐discrimination laws in provision of post‐abortion care services.

[Footnote 1:] World Health Organization. Safe Abortion: technical and policy guidance for health systems, Second Edition [WHO website]. 2012  online at WHO website. Accessed August 21, 2019.

Related Resource
Published Ob/gyn guidelines from the FIGO Ethics Committee:
Ethical Issues in Obstetrics and Gynecology   English, French and Spanish.

______________
Compiled by: the International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, reprohealth*law at utoronto.ca.   See Program website for our PublicationsInformation resources, and Reprohealthlaw Commentaries Series.
TO JOIN THE REPROHEALTHLAW BLOG: enter your email address in the upper right corner of our blog, then check your email to confirm the subscription.


Brazil: Why is decriminalization necessary (in first trimester)?

August 26, 2019

One year after the Brazilian Supreme Court held its public hearing on ADPF 442, the petition to decriminalize abortion in the first trimester, the Anis Bioethical Institute has recently made its publication: “Abortion: Why is decriminalization necessary?” available in English, Spanish and Portuguese (scroll down). In clear, accessible language, it describes the various arguments presented at the public hearing in Brasília, the federal capital, on August 3rd and 6th, 2018. The arguments are grounded in public health, bioethics, international law, social sciences, and the role of religions in a secular state. The evidence presented is indispensable to any serious debate about health policy.

Abortion: Why is decriminalization necessary?” is divided into seven main themes that demonstrate, one by one, that criminalization is ineffective not only because it does not prevent abortions, but, worse, because it kills and harms women. In addition, the data presented shows that criminalization is discriminatory — the risks of unsafe abortion fall disproportionately on Black and Indigenous women, and women who live in marginalized communities.

Criminalization has not reduced the number of abortions anywhere in the world; on the contrary, there is evidence from several countries that abortion rates actually decrease in the years following decriminalization. In other words, to protect fetal life, it is better to work with women, not against them.

The booklet is now available in English, Spanish and Portuguese, on this webpage. so that it will be useful to others in the region and their advocacy strategies. With reliable data and stories, we can say: abortion is healthcare.

Related Resources:

[ADPF 442 of 2018]: “Brazilian Supreme Court Public Hearing on the Decriminalization of Abortion:   Antecedents, Contents, Meanings” by Sonia Corrêa  (published by Sexuality Policy Watch, 2018)  27 pages PDF     Direct download.

Testimony by Prof. Rebecca Cook . . .against Unsafe Abortion in the Public Hearing of the Brazilian Supreme Court, caso ADPF 442, Brasilia, August 3, 2018.   English original.    em Portugues do Brasil. Testimonio en Espanol.  

[about ADPF 54 of 2012:] “Bringing Abortion into the Brazilian Public Debate: Legal Strategies for Anencephalic Pregnancy,” by Luis Roberto Barroso, in Abortion Law in Transnational Perspective: Cases and Controversies, ed. Rebecca J. Cook, Joanna N. Erdman and Bernard M. Dickens (Penn Press, 2014) 258-278. English abstract. Table of Contents with abstracts. Edition en espanol. Resumo en espanol.

“Constitutionalizing Abortion in Brazil.” by Marta Machado and Rebecca J. Cook, Revista de Investigações Constitucionais / Journal of Constitutional Research, Curitiba, vol. 5, n. 3, p. 185-231, set./dez. 2018. 47 pages. DOI: 10.1590/2179-8966/2019/43406 Abstract and Article in English. SSRN English copy. em portugues do Brasil

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Compiled by: the International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, reprohealth*law at utoronto.ca.   See Program website for our PublicationsInformation resources, and Reprohealthlaw Commentaries SeriesTO JOIN THE REPROHEALTHLAW BLOG: enter your email address in the upper right corner of our blog, then check your email to confirm the subscription.


UToronto Law seeks Director, International Human Rights Program

July 11, 2019

Apply before July 20, 2019 at 3:59 a.m. EST.
Director, International Human Rights Program (Job #1902704)
Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, Canada
Official Job Details and application info online here.

About IHRP:

The International Human Rights Program enhances the legal protection of existing and emerging international human rights obligations through advocacy, knowledge-exchange, and capacity-building initiatives that provide experiential learning opportunities for students, and legal expertise to civil society, through the following programs and initiatives:

The Director of the International Human Rights Program (“IHRP”) provides clinical, educational, and administrative leadership and support to the IHRP. The Director is the primary contact and responsible for all matters related to the IHRP.  The Director oversees all of the IHRP’s advocacy initiatives, including the clinic, working groups, speaker series, Rights Review magazine, internships, and the mentorship program.   The Director works with the Faculty to select advocacy opportunities for the IHRP, supervises students working on advocacy, and develops and delivers clinical legal education programs, seminars and IHRP experiential education delivery offerings at the Faculty.  Working closely with the Faculty, including the Assistant Dean, the Director develops priorities, strategies, and objectives for the IHRP.  The Director organizes and runs seminars, programs, workshops and conferences; drafts position papers, reports, and pleadings; represents the IHRP to various stakeholder groups, including the legal profession, judiciary, policy makers, public interest advocates, private organizations, government, funders, and law schools across Canada and internationally; and oversees all operations, including internal and external communications, finance, fundraising, public relations, and publications.

The Faculty of Law is one of the oldest professional faculties at the University of Toronto. Today, it is one of the world’s great law schools. The Faculty’s rich academic programs are complemented by its many legal clinics and public interest programs [including the International Human Rights Program].  

Qualifications required:

EDUCATION
LL.B. (J.D.) degree required or an equivalent combination of education and experience.  LL.M or other graduate degree is an asset.

EXPERIENCE
Minimum five (5) years of  related experience in a law firm, public organization, or government office, including experience relevant to international human rights advocacy and litigation.  Extensive variety of experience in dealing with members of the legal profession and international human rights advocates, both within and outside Canada.  Strong familiarity with legal education, public interest advocacy, and international human rights law.  Related experience in senior positions within administration and management in a publicly funded or public interest organization is an asset.  Wide range of career experience, including dealings with the media, funders, students, and the general public is an asset.  Comprehensive and global understanding of the University of Toronto, as well as general knowledge of the post-secondary education system, is an asset.  Must be a member in good standing with the Law Society of Upper Canada and be able to practice law in the Province of Ontario.  The ability to practice law in another jurisdiction is an asset.   

SKILLS
Proficient with MS Office (i.e., Word, Excel, PowerPoint), and internet searching.   

Demonstrated superior oral and written communication and advocacy skills.  Excellent research and analytical skills.  Strong project management skills.  Effective problem solver.  Well-developed judgment and decision-making skills.  Strong fundraising skills, including experience in grant development. Strong leadership skills.  Superior drive and enterprise.  Ability to manage conflicting priorities and deadlines.  Ability to handle matters of a sensitive and confidential nature.  Diplomacy, discretion, tact, pleasant manner, and an ability to work well independently as well as with a wide variety of people.     

Pay Scale and Position Notes

One-year term from date of hire, possibility of renewal.
Full-time Pay Scale Group and Hiring Rate: PM 4 — Hiring Zone: $91,506 – $106,758 — Broadband Salary Range: $91,506 – $152,510    Employee Group: Professional / Managerial 
Appointment Type: Budget – Term 
Travel: Extended   

Apply by: Jul 20, 2019, 3:59 a.m. EST

Details and application information here.


REPROHEALTHLAW Updates – June 2019

June 28, 2019

SUBSCRIBE TO REPROHEALTHLAW: To receive these updates monthly by email, enter your address in upper right corner of this webpage, then check your email to confirm the subscription.

DEVELOPMENTS:

[abortion, Germany]: Two more doctors fined for “advertising” abortion.  Newspaper report.  Criminal restrictions on abortion “advertising” restricts information provision – comment by Stephanie Schlitt.

[abortion, United Kingdom] UK Appeal court overturns forced abortion ruling. Termination had been said to be in best interests of woman with learning disabilities. The Guardian newspaper.

[abortion law, Croatia]:  Constitutional Court decision of February 21, 2017.  Rješenje Ustavnog Suda Republike Hrvatske, broj: U-I-60/1991 i dr. od 21.veljace 2017.  Decision in Croatian.  Summary from CRR.   Court’s press release.   New: Judgment translated into English.    I-CONnect Symposium online.

[abortion law, Mexico]  Suprema Corte de Justicia de la Nación, Primera Sala [Supreme Court] 2019,  Amparo en Revisión 1388/2015
[Case of “Marisa,” ruled that abortion should be allowed when mother’s health at risk]  May 15, 2019.  Decision in Spanish.   Backup copy.

[Costa Rica] Emergency contraception (Levonorgestrel) approved by Ministry of Health, for sale without prescription.  News article.

[homosexuality rulings]:
“Botswana’s High Court decriminalizes gay sex.”  June 12, 2019.  New York Times report.
“India: [Supreme] Court legalises gay sex in landmark ruling,” Sept 6, 2018.  BBC Report.
“Kenya: High Court upholds a ban on gay sex.”  EG & 7 others v Attorney General; DKM & 9 others Petition 150 & 234 of 2016 (consolidated), decision May 24, 2019  Decision online.    New York Times report.  Activists plan to appeal. Human Rights Watch report.

SCHOLARSHIP:

[abortion law, Brazil, Portuguese and English article]
—— “Constitucionalização do aborto no Brasil: uma análise a partir do caso da gravidez anencefálica,” por Marta Rodriguez de Assis Machado y Rebecca J. Cook. Revista Direito e Práxis, Ahead of print, Rio de Janeiro, 2019. DOI: 10.1590/2179-8966/2019/43406
Disponível em: Portugues, antes da impressão.
Resumo en Portugues.

—— “Constitutionalizing abortion in Brazil,” Marta Rodriguez de Assis Machado y Rebecca J. Cook. Revista de Investigações Constitucionais, Curitiba, vol. 5, n. 3, p. 185-231, set./dez. 2018. DOI: 10.5380/rinc.v5i3.60973. Article in English. Abstract and related resources.

[abortion law, Chile] The misrepresentation of conscientious objection as a new strategy of resistance to abortion decriminalisation,” by Verónica Undurraga and Michelle Sadler, Sexual and Reproductive Health Matters 27.2 (2019):1–3.  Abstract on Reprohealthlaw.   Article online

[abortion law, Croatia]: “Symposium: The 2017 Croatian Constitutional Court’s Abortion Ruling,” International Journal of Constitutional Law Blog (I-CONnect), June 15-18, 2019) includes comments from 3 legal scholars:
—— “Reconciling with the Past, Looking to the Future,” by Prof. Djordje Gardašević  Introduction
—— “A Nominal Win for Reproductive Freedom,” by Prof. Ana Horvat Vuković   Reproductive Freedom.
—— “Finding Common Ground amid Differences in Approach,” by Prof. Sonia Human  Common Ground.

[abortion law, South Korea] “Punishment for Abortion will Vanish from Korea’s Criminal Code: the April 2019 Constitutional Court Decision,” by Professor Hyunah Yang, Seoul National University School of Law  Commentary on Reprohealthlaw.

[USA]:  Reproductive Rights and Justice Stories (Law Stories Series), ed. Melissa Murray, Katherine Shaw, and Reva B. Siegel. Foundation Press, 2019. includes litigation stories behind important cases. Publisher’s summary.   Symposium about the book

US-focused news, resources, and legal developments are available  on Repro Rights Prof Blog. View or subscribe.

REPORTS

[Dominican Republic] “I Felt Like the World Was Falling Down on Me,”  Adolescent Girls’ Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights in the Dominican Republic (New York: Human Rights Watch, June 18, 2019)     Report in English.   en Español

[Honduras]  “Life or Death Choices for Women Living Under Honduras’ Abortion Ban,” (Human Rights Watch, 2019) Report in English.    en Español

[sex education – Canada] Canadian Guidelines for Sexual Health Education (updated edition, SIECAN (Sex Information & Education Council of Canada), May 1, 2019)  Guidelines, in Englishet en Francais.

JOBS

Links to employers in the field of Reproductive and Sexual Health Law are online here.
______________
Compiled by: the International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, reprohealth*law at utoronto.ca.   See Program website for our PublicationsInformation resources, and Reprohealthlaw Commentaries SeriesTO JOIN THE REPROHEALTHLAW BLOG: enter your email address in the upper right corner of our blog, then check your email to confirm the subscription.