REPROHEALTHLAW Updates – October 2018

October 31, 2018

SUBSCRIBE TO REPROHEALTHLAW: To receive these updates monthly by email, enter your address in upper right corner of this webpage, then check your email to confirm the subscription.

DEVELOPMENTS

Bulgaria:  Constitutional Court declares the Istanbul Convention against violence against women  unconstitutional.  July 27, 2018.  Oxford Human Rights Hub article.

Constitutional Court of Croatia.  Decision of March 2, 2017.  Rješenje Ustavnog Suda Republike Hrvatske, broj: U-I-60/1991 i dr. od 21.veljace 2017.  Decision online in Croatian. Backup copy.  Summary in English from CRR   Croatian Court’s Press release – 11 pages in English.

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS:

Fourth International Congress on Women’s Health and Unsafe abortion (IWAC 2019), February 19-22, 2019, Asia Hotel, Bangkok Thailand  Theme:  “We Trust Women: Universal Access to Safe Abortion.”  Submit abstracts by Nov 15, 2018  Call for Abstracts

SCHOLARSHIP:

Abortion Law in Transnational Perspective: Cases and Controversies, ed. Rebecca Cook, Joanna Erdman and Bernard Dickens (Philadelphia: Univ. Pennsylvania Press, 2014) Now in Paperback.  20% discount code: PH70.  English abstracts.   Spanish edition – abstractsTable of Cases in English or Spanish.

[Africa]  “(De)Criminalizing Adolescent Sex: A Rights-Based Assessment of Age of Consent Laws in Eastern and Southern Africa,” by Godfrey Dalitso Kangaude and Ann Skelton,  (peer-reviewed) Sage Open 2018 (Oct-Dec): 1-12.   Article online.

[Brazil – anencephaly – Supreme Court]   “The STF decision on abortion of anencephalic fetus: A Feminist Discourse Analysis” by Lucia Goncalves de Freitas, Alfa, Sao Paulo, 62.1 (2018): 11-33.   Article in English.

[Brazil – obstetric care, maternal mortality /morbidity, Alyne case]  “Implementing international human rights recommendations to improve obstetric care in Brazil,” by Alicia E Yamin, Beatriz Galli and Sandra Valongueiro.   International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 143.1 (October 2018): 114-120.    Download full text PDF now, because Free Access expires in 6 months.    Abstract online in English   For Portuguese abstract, click on :Supporting Information”.  

[Brazil – zika, microcephaly]  BOOK:  Zika: from the Brazilian backlands to a Global Threat (Zed Books, 2017)  in English  and  Portuguese .

[conscience]  “Balancing Freedom of Conscience and Equitable Access,” by Wendy Chavkin, Desiree Abu-Odeh, Catherine Clune-Taylor, Sara Dubow PhD, Michael Ferber and Ilan H. Meyer, American Journal of Public Health 108.11 (Nov 2018): 1487-88.  Article online.

[conscientious objection, Ireland] “Conscientious Objection, Harm Reduction and Abortion Care,”  by Ruth Fletcher, in Mary Donnelly and Claire Murray eds., Ethical and Legal Debates in Irish Healthcare: Confronting Complexities (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2016) pp. 24-40.  Pre-publication version.     Book information

[conscientious objection – South Africa “Let’s call ‘conscientious objection’ by its name: Obstruction of access to care and abortion in South Africa,” by Satang Nabaneh, Marion Stevens & Lucía Berro Pizzarossa,  24 October 2018, Oxford Human Rights Hub.

[Forced sterilization] “Gendered Power Relations and Informed Consent: The I.V. v. Bolivia Case,” by Martín Hevia and Andrés Constantin, Health and Human Rights JournalEarly view of full text.

[Intersex] “Management of intersex newborns: Legal and ethical developments,” by Bernard M. Dickens, International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics  143.2 (Nov. 2018): 255–259.  PDF at Wiley online.   Submitted text at SSRN.

[Ireland] “Reproductive Justice in Ireland: A Feminist Analysis of the Neary and Halappanavar Cases,” by Joan McCarthy,  in: Mary Donnelly and Claire Murray, eds., Ethical and Legal Debates in Irish Healthcare: Confronting Complexities (Manchester, UK: Manchester University Press, 2016).   Submitted Text online.   Book information

[Ireland and Britain] “Reproductive rebellions in Britain and the Republic of Ireland: contemporary and past abortion activism and alternative sites of care,” by Ben Kasstan and Sarah Crook, in Feminist Encounters: A Journal of Critical Studies in Culture and Politics, 2.2 (2018):  1-16.  Article online.

Annotated Bibliographies now available:  Right to Conscience
Fetal anomaly indication for abortion Rape or Incest abortion – English.  or Spanish)  Latin America:  Causal violación y/o incesto   (Toronto: International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, 2018).

US-focused news, resources, and legal developments are available  on Repro Rights Prof Blog.   View or subscribe.


JOBS

Links to employers in the field of Reproductive and Sexual Health Law are online here
______________
Compiled by the Coordinator of the International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, reprohealth*law at utoronto.ca For Program publications and resources, see our website, online here. TO JOIN THIS BLOG: enter your email address in upper right corner of this webpage, then check your email to confirm the subscription.

 

 

 

 


“Reproductive justice in Ireland: A feminist analysis of the Neary and Halappanavar cases,” by Joan McCarthy

October 31, 2018

Congratulations to Professor Joan McCarthy, whose chapter on two significant Irish controversies was published in 2016.  The submitted text is now online in the author’s institutional repository.  We are pleased to circulate her abstract:

Joan McCarthy,  “Reproductive Justice in Ireland: A Feminist Analysis of the Neary and Halappanavar Cases,” in Mary Donnelly and Claire Murray, eds.,  Ethical and Legal Debates in Irish Healthcare: Confronting Complexities (Manchester, UK: Manchester University Press, 2016), 9-23.
Submitted Text online.

This chapter offers a feminist reading of two Irish cases that raise important ethical and legal concerns:  the unnecessary peripartum hysterectomies at Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital Drogheda and the tragic death of Savita Halappanavar in October 2012. Key to this feminist analysis is a desire to understand the mechanisms by which the voices and concerns of the women at the centre of these cases were ignored, marginalised and trivialised. The chapter addresses the cultural dis-ease with women’s bodies and reproductive autonomy and the excess of epistemic and moral authority vested in doctors and religious leaders and the correlated lack of authority invested in women patients and midwives.

My feminist reading of these different situations draws attention to the power and
power differentials inherent in moral relationships at individual, organisational and societal levels and adopts Margaret Urban Walker’s feminist ethics perspective which she summarises in the following way:  We welcome all relevant scientific data but believe that the social situations of both science and morals must be kept in view, paying attention to differences of social and institutional position, perspective, and power that determine which voices and whose interests and experiences are audible and authoritative in ethics as elsewhere (Walker 2009: 5).

Key to my analysis is a desire to understand the mechanisms by which the voices and concerns of the women at the centre of these two cases were ignored, marginalised and trivialised. I address each case in turn, paying particular attention to the way in which an excess of moral authority was vested in religious leaders, religious doctrine and doctors and a correlated lack of authority was invested in women patients and midwives.

The submitted text of this chapter is now online here.

More information about the book Ethical and Legal Debates in Irish Healthcare: Confronting Complexities is available from Manchester University Press.



Compiled by the Coordinator of the International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, reprohealth*law at utoronto.ca For Program publications and resources, see our website, online here. TO JOIN THIS BLOG: enter your email address in upper right corner of this webpage, then check your email to confirm the subscription.


“Conscientious objection, Harm reduction and abortion care,” by Ruth Fletcher

October 31, 2018

Congratulations to Ruth Fletcher, Senior Lecturer in Medical Law at Queen Mary University of London, whose chapter is currently online through SSRN, with the following abstract:

Ruth Fletcher, “Conscientious Objection, Harm Reduction and Abortion Care,”  in Mary Donnelly and Claire Murray eds., Ethical and Legal Debates in Irish Healthcare: Confronting Complexities (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2016) pp. 24-40.   Pre-publication version online

The scope of any legal right to refuse abortion care merits particular consideration given the passing of the Protection of Life During Pregnancy Act 2013 (PLDPA).  Irish health scholarship and practice may benefit from an account of conscientious objection (CO) that clarifies when CO is legitimately engaged by a refusal to provide care and whether CO is limited, given its potential effect as a barrier to women’s lawful access to abortion. This chapter responds to these concerns by arguing for a harm reduction approach to conscientious objection.  Those who wish to refuse provision of healthcare in spite of a legal obligation, and those who wish to provide healthcare in spite of a legal prohibition, may be harmed by having to act against their most intimate convictions.  Moreover, public reasoning about the proper scope of healthcare provision could be disadvantaged by a failure to recognize a space for critical consciousness.  The need to reduce the risk of harm to women, whose lawful entitlement to access abortion has been hard-won, also animates the justification for legal limits on CO.  In arguing for a harm reduction approach, the account offered here draws on but distinguishes itself from those who have relied on public obligations to refute CO and those who have relied on an individual right to moral integrity to ground CO.

A pre-publication version of this chapter is online here

More information about the book Ethical and Legal Debates in Irish Healthcare: Confronting Complexities is available from Manchester University Press.

Our Annotated Bibliography on “The Right to Conscience,” updated in 2018  is online here.


Compiled by the Coordinator of the International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, reprohealth*law at utoronto.ca For Program publications and resources, see our website, online here. TO JOIN THIS BLOG: enter your email address in upper right corner of this webpage, then check your email to confirm the subscription.


Management of intersex newborns: Legal and ethical developments, by Bernard Dickens

October 31, 2018

Congratulations to Prof. Bernard Dickens, whose article was recently published in the Ethical and Legal Issues in Reproductive Health series of the International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics.  We are pleased to circulate its abstract:

Management of intersex newborns: Legal and ethical developments,” by Bernard M. Dickens, International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 143.2 (Nov. 2018): 255–259.  PDF at Wiley online.   Submitted text at SSRN.

Countries worldwide are increasingly expanding male/female binary sex classifications to recognize a third status. Intersex newborns may be included in this third category on birth certification. Parents, families, and communities require counselling and education to accommodate intersex newborns without stigma or discrimination. Whatever its biological or genetic origin, intersex status is a natural if relatively uncommon condition (one in 1500–2000 live births) that distinguishes sex from gender. The tendency of societies to recognize only male and female genders at birth has resulted in intersex children being subjected to invasive surgery and related, sometimes lifelong, medication to confirm them as male or female. On gaining maturity, some are severely distressed and resentful that early gender assignment was mistaken, particularly when excision of testes to enforce femininity or of ovaries to enforce masculinity has denied them procreative capacity. Emerging principles support postponement of such interventions until intersex individuals can make a gender choice for themselves.

PDF at Wiley online for 12 months.

Full text, as submitted:   text at SSRN.

Ethical and Legal Issues in Reproductive Health: 85+ concise articles.


Compiled by the Coordinator of the International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, reprohealth*law at utoronto.ca For Program publications and resources, see our website, online here. TO JOIN THIS BLOG: enter your email address in upper right corner of this webpage, then check your email to confirm the subscription.


Brazil: Zika and human rights obligations, by Debora Diniz

October 31, 2018

Congratulations to  Professor Debora Diniz, whose book Zika: Do Sertão nordestino à ameaça global   [Zika: from the Brazilian backlands to a Global Threat] (Rio de Janeiro: Civilizaçāo Brasileira, 2016) won the 2017 Jabuti Book Prize as the best book on health.  It analyses scientific discoveries regarding Zika in Brazil,  and the impact of the epidemic on poor black and brown women’s lives.  The book is now available in English  and  Portuguese .

Professor Diniz is the founder of the Anis Institute of Bioethics and a law professor at the University of Brasilia.  As she explained in a New York Times op-ed, “The Zika Virus and Brazilian Women’s Right to Choose,” “The Zika epidemic has given Brazil a unique opportunity to look at inequality and reproductive rights, and to change how the country treats women. Asking women to avoid pregnancy without offering the necessary information, education, contraceptives or access to abortion is not a reasonable health policy. Sexual and reproductive rights for all women, poor and rich, must be taken seriously. The government should immediately offer a comprehensive package of sexual and reproductive health care to all Brazilian women, with a specific focus on those at most risk of Zika infection.”   New York Times op-ed.

Since then, a journal article, “Zika Infection in Brazil and Human Rights Obligations,” by  Debora Diniz, Sinara Gumieri, Beatriz Galli Bevilacqua, Rebecca J. Cook and Bernard M. Dickens, (International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 136.1 (2017): 105-110) has been translated and published in Portuguese and Spanish. Since the full texts are now online, we are circulating their abstracts in all three languages, with links to the full text:

Abstract:  The February 2016 WHO declaration that congenital Zika syndrome [CZS] constitutes a Public Health Emergency of International Concern reacted to the outbreak of CZS in Brazil. Public health emergencies can justify a spectrum of human rights responses, but in Brazil the emergency exposed prevailing inequities in the national health care system. The government’s urging to contain the syndrome, which is associated with microcephaly among newborns, is confounded by lack of reproductive health services in Brazil. Poor women in particular have little access to such health services. The emergency also illuminates the harm of restrictive abortion legislation, and potential violations of human rights regarding women’s health and under the UN Conventions on the Rights of the Child and on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Suggestions have been proposed by which the government can remedy the widespread healthcare inequities among the national population that are instructive for other countries where CZS is prevalent.  English article onlineEnglish submitted text.
———————

Infecção por vírus Zika no Brasil e obrigações de direitos humanos” por Debora Diniz, Sinara Gumieri, Beatriz Galli Bevilacqua, Rebecca J. Cook, y Bernard M. Dickens, forthcoming in Revista Uni Brazilia Direito     Artigo em português do Brasil

Resumo: A declaração da Organização Mundial da Saúde (OMS) em fevereiro de 2016 de que a síndrome congênita do vírus Zika era uma Emergência de Saúde Pública de Interesse Internacional foi uma reação ao surto da síndrome no Brasil. Emergências de saúde pública podem justificar uma gama de respostas de direitos humanos, mas, no Brasil, a emergência expôs desigualdades existentes no sistema de saúde nacional. O desejo do governo de conter a síndrome, que está associada à microcefalia entre recém-nascidos, é frustrado pela falta de serviços de saúde reprodutiva. As mulheres de baixa renda, em especial, têm pouco acesso a tais serviços. A crise também evidencia os danos de uma legislação de acesso ao aborto restritiva e a potencial violação dos direitos humanos em relação à saúde das mulheres e  com base em convenções da ONU sobre os Direitos das Crianças e sobre os Direitos das Pessoas com Deficiência. Algumas sugestões foram propostas para que o governo possa solucionar as imensas desigualdades de acesso à saúde entre a população brasileira, bem como colaborar com outros países nos quais a síndrome congênita do vírus Zika está se espalhando.  Artigo em português do Brasil
————————

Infección por el virus de Zika en Brasil y obligaciones relacionadas con los derechos humanos,” por Debora Diniz, Sinara Gumieri, Beatriz Galli Bevilacqua, Rebecca J. Cook, y Bernard M. Dickens, Boletin FLASOG 5.2( June 2017): 6-12.
Articulo en espanol – Boletin FLASOG, pp 6-12

Resumen:  La declaración emitida por la OMS en febrero de 2016 de que el síndrome congénito por el virus de Zika constituye una emergencia de salud pública de importancia internacional reaccionó al brote del síndrome en Brasil. Las emergencias de salud pública pueden justificar una variedad de respuestas relacionadas con los derechos humanos, pero en Brasil la emergencia expuso desigualdades persistentes en el sistema de salud nacional.   La insistencia del gobierno en contener el síndrome, que está
asociado con la microcefalia entre recién nacidos, se ha visto frustrada por la falta de servicios de salud reproductiva. Las mujeres con bajos ingresos en particular tienen poco acceso a esos servicios de salud. La emergencia también destaca el
daño de la restrictiva legislación referente al aborto y la posible violación de los derechos humanos con relación a la salud de las mujeres y bajo las Convenciones de las Naciones Unidas sobre los Derechos del Niño y sobre los Derechos de las Personas con Discapacidad. Se han propuesto sugerencias mediante las cuales el gobierno puede remediar las desigualdades generalizadas en los servicios de salud entre la población nacional, que son instructivas para otros países donde predomina el síndrome congénito por el virus de Zika.  Articulo en espanol – Boletin FLASOG, pp 6-12


Related works in English  by Debora Diniz:

Zika: from the Brazilian backlands to Global Threat (London: Zed Books, 2017), analyses scientific discoveries regarding Zika in Brazil,  and the impact of the epidemic on poor black and brown women’s lives.  Publisher’s abstract.
Zika: More than a health issue  53-minute  TV interview with English subtitles.
Zika” documentary  30 minutes with English subtitles
“Severina’s Story” documentary  22 minutes with English subtitles


Compiled by the Coordinator of the International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, reprohealth*law at utoronto.ca For Program publications and resources, see our website, online here. TO JOIN THIS BLOG: enter your email address in upper right corner of this webpage, then check your email to confirm the subscription.


Brazil: Implementing international human rights to improve obstetric care

October 31, 2018

Congratulations to Alicia E. Yamin, Beatriz Galli and Sandra Valongueiro, whose article is now available in the Latin American-themed October 2018 issue of the International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics, in conjunction with the FIGO World Congress, held October 14-19 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  We are pleased to circulate the abstract in English, and (further below) Brazilian Portuguese:

Alicia E Yamin, Beatriz Galli and Sandra Valongueiro. “Implementing international human rights recommendations to improve obstetric care in Brazil,” by  International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 143.1 (October 2018): 114-120    DOI: 10.1002/ijgo.12579.  Download full next now, Free access online for 6 months.

Abstract:  In 2011, the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) issued a groundbreaking decision in the case of Alyne da Silva Pimentel Teixeira versus Brazil involving the maternal death of a young Afro‐Brazilian woman. The CEDAW addressed systemic failures in the Brazilian health system that combined to violate Alyne’s rights to life, health, and access to maternal health services. Almost 5 years later, after significant back and forth between the concerned parties, a technical follow‐up commission was created with the support of the Center for Reproductive Rights, and was welcomed by the government of Brazil. The technical follow‐up commission was precedent‐setting, seeking to move beyond identifying gaps in “compliance” and concentrate instead on issues that might catalyze re‐engagement by national level stakeholders, both governmental and non‐governmental, with the aim of advancing CEDAW’s recommendations through not only the creation, but also the effective implementation, of policies and programs that promote women’s sexual and reproductive rights in practice, including their rights to safe motherhood. Here, the human‐rights‐based framework of the technical follow‐up commission is described, in addition to their findings related to legal and policy frameworks, evidence‐based programing, and monitoring and oversight of providers.

Resumo do artigo:  Em 2011, o Comitê das Nações Unidas para a Eliminação de Todas as Formas de Discriminação contra as Mulheres emitiu uma decisão inovadora contra a morte materna de uma jovem afro-brasileira, Alyne da Silva Pimentel Teixeira. O Comitê CEDAW apontou falhas sistêmicas no sistema de saúde brasileiro que violaram os direitos de Alyne à vida, à saúde e ao acesso a serviços de saúde materna. Quase cinco anos depois, uma Comissão de Acompanhamento Técnico foi criada, com o apoio do Centro de Direitos Reprodutivos, sendo recebida pelo Governo do Brasil. Essa Comissão de Acompanhamento Técnico estabeleceu os precedentes e procurou ir além da identificação de lacunas na “conformidade”, concentrando-se em questões que poderiam catalisar o reengajamento de atores em nível nacional, tanto governamentais como não-governamentais, com o objetivo de avançar as recomendações do Comitê CEDAW, por meio não só da criação, mas também da implementação efetiva, de políticas e programas que promovam os direitos sexuais e reprodutivos das mulheres, incluindo direito à maternidade segura. Este artigo descreve o arcabouço baseado em direitos humanos usado pela Comissão de Acompanhamento Técnico e os achados relevantes para provedores vinculados a estruturas legais e de políticas, programação baseada em evidências e monitoramento e supervisão.

Download full next now, Free access to PDF online for 6 months.

_______________________________________

Compiled by the Coordinator of the International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, reprohealth*law at utoronto.ca For Program publications and resources, see our website, online here. TO JOIN THIS BLOG: enter your email address in upper right corner of this webpage, then check your email to confirm the subscription.


REPROHEALTHLAW Updates – Sept 2018

September 30, 2018

SUBSCRIBE TO REPROHEALTHLAW: To receive these updates monthly by email, enter your address in upper right corner of this webpage, then check your email to confirm the subscription.

DEVELOPMENTS

[UN – CEDAW and CRPD] “Guaranteeing sexual and reproductive health and rights for all women, in particular women with disabilities,”   Joint statement by the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and the Committee on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), 29 August 2018.  Decriminalize abortion, repeal discriminatory health policies and abortion laws that perpetuate deep-rooted stereotypes and stigma and undermine women’s reproductive autonomy and choice.    PDF online.

CALL FOR PAPERS:

“The Impact of Politics on Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights,” for publication in Reproductive Health Matters, May 2019.  Submissions due October 31, 2018.  RHM Call for papers

SCHOLARSHIP:

[abortion law – Brazil]    “Brazilian Supreme Court Public Hearing on the Decriminalization of Abortion:   Antecedents, Contents, Meanings” by Sonia Corrêa  (published by Sexuality Policy Watch, 2018)  27 pages PDF     Direct download.

[abortion law – Brazil]  Testimony by Prof. Rebecca Cook . . .against Unsafe Abortion in the Public Hearing of the Brazilian Supreme Court, caso ADPF 442, Brasilia, August 3, 2018.   English original.    em Portugues do Brasil.   Testimonio – Espanol traducido por CLACAI (Consorcio Latinoamericano contra el aborto inseguro).    Uno otro en Espanol.  

[abortion law – El Salvador] “Physicians’ Challenges under El Salvador’s Criminal Abortion Prohibition,” by Alyson Zureick, Amber Khan, Angeline Chen and Astrid Reyes. forthcoming International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics, October2018  Early view PDF.   Submitted text online at SSRN.

[abortion law – Malawi] “The Duty to make abortion law transparent:  A Malawi case study,”  by Godfrey Dalitso Kangaude and Chisale Mhango, forthcoming International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics,     Early view PDF.

Abortion Law in Transnational Perspective: Cases and Controversies, ed. Rebecca Cook, Joanna Erdman and Bernard Dickens (Philadelphia: Univ. Pennsylvania Press, 2014) 20% discount code is PH70.  Abstracts of all 16 chapters.   Spanish edition by FCE/CIDE – 16 abstractsAbortion Decisions: Table of Cases in English and Spanish.

[abortion policy] “The Philippines rolls back advancements in the postabortion care policy,” by Melissa Upreti and Jihan Jacob,  International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 142 (August 2018): 255–256.   PDF onlineSubmitted text  at SSRN.

[abortion policies] “Access to knowledge and the Global Abortion  Policies Database,”  by Joanna N. Erdman and Brooke Ronald Johnson Jr.  International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics, July 2018; 142: 120–124   PDF at Wiley online.   Submitted text at SSRN.

[Africanness, including sexuality],  What is Africanness?: Contesting nativism in culture, race and sexualities, peer-reviewed book by Charles G. Ngwena (Pretoria University Law Press, 2018) 306 pages.  “Part 3: Heterogeneous Sexualities” – chapter abstracts.    Entire book open access at PULP.     Table of Contents.   Overview, Comments from scholars,  PDFs of all chapters.

[Brazil – obstetric care, maternal mortality /morbidity, Alyne case]  “Implementing international human rights recommendations to improve obstetric care in Brazil,” by Alicia E Yamin, Beatriz Galli and Sandra Valongueiro.   International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 143.1 (October 2018): 114-120    Abstract online in English and Portuguese. English PDF for institutional subscribers.

[CEDAW]”The Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women” by Rebecca J. Cook and Cusack, Simone Cusack.  In Tara Van Ho and Nigel Rodley, eds, Research Handbook on Human Rights Institutions and Enforcement (Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd, Forthcoming).  Submitted text archived online.

[conscience]  Unconscionable: When Providers Deny Abortion Care  Report of the International Women’s Health Coalition, 2018, based on the first global meeting on the topic of “conscientious objection,” held in Montevideo, Uruguay in August 2017.    8-page report.

[intersex, gender] “Management of intersex newborns: Legal and ethical developments,by Bernard M. Dickens, forthcoming International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 2018.   Early View PDF.

[self-managed abortion] “Understandings of self-managed abortion as health inequity, harm reduction and social change,” by Joanna N. Erdman, Kinga Jelinska and Susan Yanow. Forthcoming in Reproductive Health Matters. Early view PDF.

[strategic litigation] Seeking Social Change in the Courts: Tools for Strategic Advocacy, by Mónica Roa with Barbara Klugman (Women’s Link Worldwide, 2018) practical tool for advocates from all social justice fields who are interested in using the courts and understanding “strategic litigation”  160 pages, PDF online..

ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHIES:

“The Right to Conscience” – An Annotated Bibliography.   (Toronto: International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program,
Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, 2018)  Conscience bibliography

Indications for abortion: new annotated bibliographies:

  • Fetal Anomaly:  Annotated Bibliography on legal aspects of fetal anomaly and their implications for counseling, service delivery and abortion laws and policies (Toronto: International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, 2018).  Fetal anomaly bibliography
  • Rape-related abortion:  Legal and policy dimensions of rape-related abortion services (Court decisions, Treaty resources, policy guidance and publications. ) (Toronto: International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, 2018).  Rape or Incest bibliography 
  • Causal Violacion y/o incesto:  Selección de doctrina y jurisprudencia latinoamericanas sobre Causal violación y/o incesto en casos de aborto (Rape or Incest bibliography in Spanish)  (Toronto: El Programa Internacional de Derecho en Salud Sexual y Reproductivas Facultad de Derecho, Universidad de Toronto, 2018)

US-focused news, resources, and legal developments are available  on Repro Rights Prof Blog.   View or subscribe.


JOBS

Links to employers in the field of Reproductive and Sexual Health Law are online here
______________
Compiled by the Coordinator of the International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, reprohealth*law at utoronto.ca For Program publications and resources, see our website, online here. TO JOIN THIS BLOG: enter your email address in upper right corner of this webpage, then check your email to confirm the subscription.